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+一些关于字幕的研究

File steve_jobs_interview/failed/2010.01.20.srt

+1
+00:01:01,082 --> 00:01:11,075
+what is it about this machine?
+Why is this machine so interesting?
+Why has it been so influential?
+
+2
+00:01:11,110 --> 00:01:14,674
+Ah ahm, I'll give you my point of view on it.
+
+3
+00:01:15,491 --> 00:01:19,213
+I remember reading a magazine
+article a long time ago
+
+4
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+ah when I was ah twelve years ago maybe,
+in I think it was Scientific American.
+
+5
+00:01:25,591 --> 00:01:33,528
+I'm not sure.
+And the article ahm proposed to measure the efficiency of locomotion for ah lots of species on planet earth
+
+6
+00:01:34,103 --> 00:01:41,606
+to see which species was the most efficient at getting from point A to point B.
+Ah and they measured the killer calories that each one expended.
+
+7
+00:01:42,221 --> 00:01:45,670
+So ah they ranked them all and I remember that ahm...
+
+8
+00:01:47,288 --> 00:01:52,778
+ah the Condor, Condor was the most efficient at
+[CLEARS THROAT] getting from point A to point B.
+
+9
+00:01:53,845 --> 00:01:59,283
+And humankind, the crown of creation came in with a rather
+unimpressive showing about a third of the way down the list.
+
+10
+00:02:00,726 --> 00:02:06,968
+So ah that didn't look so great.
+But ah, let me do this over again.
+
+11
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+I remember ah reading an article when I was about twelve years old.
+
+12
+00:02:19,533 --> 00:02:22,041
+I think it might have been Scientific
+American where they measured
+
+13
+00:02:22,616 --> 00:02:25,488
+the efficiency of locomotion of
+all these species on planet earth.
+
+14
+00:02:26,250 --> 00:02:28,146
+How many killer calories did they
+expend to get from point A to point B?
+
+15
+00:02:29,967 --> 00:02:34,300
+And the Condor came in at the top of
+the list ah surpassed everything else.
+
+16
+00:02:34,688 --> 00:02:37,525
+And humans came in about a
+third of the way down the list
+
+17
+00:02:38,162 --> 00:02:40,278
+which was not such a great
+showing for the crown of creation.
+
+18
+00:02:41,416 --> 00:02:47,462
+And ah but somebody there had the imagination
+to test the efficiency of a human riding a bicycle.
+
+19
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+A human riding a bicycle blew away the Condor
+all the way off the top of the list.
+And it made a really big impression on me that
+
+20
+00:02:55,691 --> 00:03:03,716
+we humans are tool builders.
+And that we can fashion tools that
+amplify these inherent abilities that we have to spectacular magnitudes.
+
+21
+00:03:04,345 --> 00:03:08,488
+And so for me, a computer has
+always been a bicycle of the mind.
+
+22
+00:03:10,707 --> 00:03:17,092
+Ah something that takes us far beyond our inherent abilities.
+And ah I think we're just at the early stages of this tool.
+
+23
+00:03:18,630 --> 00:03:22,007
+Very early stages.
+And we've come only a very short distance.
+
+24
+00:03:23,341 --> 00:03:26,236
+And it's still in its formation, but
+already we've seen enormous changes.
+
+25
+00:03:26,635 --> 00:03:28,270
+I think that's nothing compared to
+what's coming in the next hundred years.
+
+26
+00:03:30,576 --> 00:03:35,438
+In program six we're going to look at some of the past predictions of why people have been so wrong about the future.
+
+27
+00:03:36,260 --> 00:03:44,146
+And one of the notions is that today's vision of a standalone computer is
+just as limited as those past visions of it being only a number cruncher.
+
+28
+00:03:45,295 --> 00:03:48,415
+What's the difference philosophically between a network machine and a standalone machine?
+
+29
+00:03:50,910 --> 00:03:52,638
+Let me answer that question a slightly different way.
+
+30
+00:03:54,860 --> 00:03:59,861
+There have been, if you look at why
+the majority of people have bought these things so far,
+
+31
+00:04:01,453 --> 00:04:05,614
+ah there have been two real explosions that have propelled the industry forward.
+
+32
+00:04:06,394 --> 00:04:11,194
+The first one ah really happened in 1977.
+And it was the spreadsheets.
+
+33
+00:04:12,170 --> 00:04:15,999
+I remember when ah Dan Fylstra
+who ran the company that marketed the first spreadsheet,
+
+34
+00:04:16,443 --> 00:04:21,977
+walked not my office at Apple one day and
+pulled out this disk from his vest pocket and said,
+
+35
+00:04:22,302 --> 00:04:26,652
+"I...I have this incredible new program.
+I call it a visual calculator.
+" And it became Visicalc.
+
+36
+00:04:27,943 --> 00:04:31,147
+And that's what really drove,
+propelled the Apple to...to the success
+
+37
+00:04:33,344 --> 00:04:38,328
+it achieved more than any other single event.
+And...and with ah the invention of Lotus 123,
+
+38
+00:04:40,036 --> 00:04:44,869
+and I think it was 1982, that's what really propelled
+the IBM PC to the level of success that it achieved.
+
+39
+00:04:47,478 --> 00:04:50,054
+So that was the first explosion was
+the spreadsheet. Ahm the second major
+
+40
+00:04:50,940 --> 00:04:53,976
+explosion has driven our, the desktop
+industry has been desktop publishing.
+
+41
+00:04:55,825 --> 00:05:35,359
+[MISC BACKGROUND]
+
+42
+00:05:36,156 --> 00:05:39,961
+The...the second really bit explosion
+in our industry has been desktop publishing.
+
+43
+00:05:45,991 --> 00:05:46,590
+Happened in 1985 with the Macintosh and the laser
+writer printer. And at that point people could start
+
+44
+00:05:47,749 --> 00:05:50,970
+to do on their desktops things that only typesetters
+and printers could do prior to that. And that's
+
+45
+00:05:51,844 --> 00:05:56,513
+been a very big revolution in publishing. And
+those are really, those two explosions have been the
+
+46
+00:05:57,123 --> 00:06:01,762
+only two real major revolutions which have caused
+a lot of people to buy these things and use them.
+
+47
+00:06:04,791 --> 00:06:09,415
+Ah the third one is starting to happen
+now. And the third one is let's do for
+
+48
+00:06:09,626 --> 00:06:14,457
+human to human communication what
+spreadsheets did for financial planning and
+
+49
+00:06:14,492 --> 00:06:17,915
+what public, desktop publishing did
+for publishing. Let's revolutionize it
+
+50
+00:06:17,950 --> 00:06:22,954
+using these desktop devices. And we're
+already starting to see the signs of that.
+
+51
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+As an example in an organization,
+
+52
+00:06:25,199 --> 00:06:31,128
+we're starting to see that as
+business conditions change faster
+
+53
+00:06:31,163 --> 00:06:36,735
+and faster with each year, ah
+we cannot change our management
+
+54
+00:06:36,770 --> 00:06:40,512
+hierarchical organization very fast
+relative to the changing business
+
+55
+00:06:40,547 --> 00:06:43,472
+conditions. We can't have somebody
+working for a new boss every week.
+
+56
+00:06:43,507 --> 00:06:49,269
+We also can't change our geographic organization
+very fast. As a matter of fact even slower
+
+57
+00:06:49,304 --> 00:06:54,012
+than the management one. We can't be moving
+people around the country every week. But we
+
+58
+00:06:54,047 --> 00:07:00,222
+can change an electronic organization like
+that. And what's starting to happen is as we
+
+59
+00:07:00,257 --> 00:07:04,757
+start to link these computers together with
+sophisticated networks and great user interfaces,
+
+60
+00:07:04,792 --> 00:07:12,892
+we're starting to be able to create clusters of people working
+on a common task in a s... you know literally in fifteen minutes
+
+61
+00:07:12,927 --> 00:07:19,040
+worth of setup. And these fifteen people can work together
+extremely efficiently no matter where they are geographically.
+
+62
+00:07:19,075 --> 00:07:22,983
+And no matter who they work for
+hierarchically. And these organizations can
+
+63
+00:07:23,018 --> 00:07:28,831
+live for as long as they're needed and
+then vanish. And we're finding we can
+
+64
+00:07:28,866 --> 00:07:35,597
+reorganize our companies electronically
+ah very rapidly. And that's the only type
+
+65
+00:07:35,632 --> 00:07:39,875
+of organization that can begin to keep
+pace with the changing business conditions.
+
+66
+00:07:39,910 --> 00:07:44,671
+And I believe that this collaborative model has existed in higher education for a long time.
+
+67
+00:07:44,706 --> 00:07:50,573
+But we're starting to see it applied into the commercial
+world as well. And this is going to be the third major
+
+68
+00:07:50,608 --> 00:07:56,373
+revolution that these desktop computers provide is
+revolutionizing human to human communication in group work.
+
+69
+00:07:56,408 --> 00:08:00,920
+We call it interpersonal computing. In
+the 1985 we did personal computing. Ah and
+
+70
+00:08:00,955 --> 00:08:05,539
+now we're going to extend that as we network
+these things to interpersonal computing.
+
+71
+00:08:09,843 --> 00:08:15,612
+What was the image of the computer
+in the mid 196Os or whenever you first saw one?
+
+72
+00:08:16,858 --> 00:08:18,399
+And where are we now?
+
+73
+00:08:26,330 --> 00:08:26,776
+I ahm, I first saw my first computer when I was twelve.
+
+74
+00:08:26,811 --> 00:08:36,526
+[MUMBLES] I saw my first computer when I was twelve. And it
+was at NASA. We had a local NASA center nearby. And it was
+
+75
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+It had a very small cathode ray tube on it for display.
+And I got a chance to play with one of those maybe in 1968
+
+76
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+And ah so my point of view never really
+changed from being able to get my arms around it
+
+77
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+What was the role, how have personal computers changed the landscape of computers?
+
+78
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+I mean back then it was centralized
+power, it was in a mainframe.
+
+79
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+Now we have three times as much
+power at the fringe than we have in
+
+80
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well, though the analogy is nowhere
+perfect and certainly ah one needs to factor
+
+81
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+said for comparing it to going from trains,
+from passenger trains to automobiles.
+
+82
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+But it has created ah, it has created problems. And the
+largest problems are that ah now that we have all these very
+
+83
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+a fabric of these things rather than
+just individual points of light if you
+
+84
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+What's the vision behind the next machine?
+
+85
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Everything that ah, that we've done in our [PAUSES]
+Everything I've done with computers in my life has been along
+
+86
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+we observed was that the computing power
+we could give to an individual was an
+
+87
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+So the technology to build that became available. And
+most important we saw a way to build a software system
+
+88
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+[TAPE CUT]
+what's the vision behind NEXT?
+
+89
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Ahm it's not so much different than
+everything I've ever done in my life with
+
+90
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Number one was to put a much more
+powerful computer in front of people for
+
+91
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+into the computer so we can begin
+to make this next revolution within
+
+92
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+very well. And the third thing,
+and maybe the most important was to
+
+93
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+And there's only been three systems that have
+ever been successful in the whole history of
+
+94
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+The IBM PC and Macintosh. So we're attempting to create the
+fourth platform software standard and hopefully we'll succeed
+
+95
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+What happens when you have a network that allows the
+relative minorities in a whole different area come together.
+
+96
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+I don't know.
+
+97
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Okay.
+
+98
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+But... but what I have seen is I've seen
+interpersonal computing happening at our own company.
+
+99
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+Or maybe the best way to put it is ahm, I remember when
+the first spreadsheet came out. I saw it fly through Apple
+
+100
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+And I've seen the same thing happen
+with interpersonal computing here
+
+101
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And it's it's actually larger than the first two. Let me
+give you some examples. Ah if we want to ah, if we're going
+
+102
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+WGBH.
+
+103
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+WGBH. we're going to be doing a special project
+with WGBH. And what we'll do is we'll create a ah
+
+104
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+Now these twenty people will be from
+all over our company. From marketing,
+
+105
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+And if ah one sends a reply they'll copy the whole
+mailbox so the rest of the team members get to read ah the
+
+106
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+a day. And they'll spend about twenty minutes, thirty
+minutes reading these and answering these per day. And it will
+
+107
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+So I'll put my own name on this mailbox and
+l'll see these thirty mail messages fly by.
+
+108
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+And after a month or so when I know that
+it's going well I can take my name off.
+
+109
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+There was an article written by a guy by the name of ...
+
+110
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+[END OF TAPE] As we become part of
+this electronically community ahm
+
+111
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+abilities. But we still always want
+to be able to disconnect that network
+
+112
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+Now what's going to happen rapidly as with radio
+links and with fiber optics to the home, you're
+
+113
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+So we have to provide a fluid way for these things
+to kind of dock into the mother load network, but also
+
+114
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+no radio links and no fiber optic links and still be
+able to use it and then come back and dock back into
+
+115
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+So we're working on that. That's our goal
+for the next five years is that seamless
+
+116
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+It also keeps away the welling aspects of always being hooked into the network.
+
+117
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+That's right. I actually think what
+an interesting paradox is the network
+
+118
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+Not keeping our recipes on these things or something like we
+thought in 1975. Ah being a part of that network and not being
+
+119
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+But computers then then won't be just computers.
+They'll be radios, and stereos, and TVs.
+
+120
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+No I think, I think they'll be just computers. Just like your phone
+isn't your television set. Just like your toaster isn't your radio.
+
+121
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Ah we see multi media as more of a means. In other
+words, people aren't going to buy a computer for multi
+
+122
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And in that communication, in
+addition to a text, they're going to
+
+123
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+I want to get your thoughts
+on the user interface stuff.
+
+124
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Ahm well Xerox PARC was a...
+
+125
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Doug had invented the mouse, and invented the
+BIP map display. And some Xerox folks that...
+
+126
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And it was just instantly obvious to anyone that
+this was the way things should be. Ahm and so I
+
+127
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+The problem was that Xerox had
+never made a commercial computer.
+
+128
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+What did you succeed in doing with the MAC?
+
+129
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well the Macintosh as you remember
+when it came out, we called it the
+
+130
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+could use some of the computers that
+were already out, most people didn't
+
+131
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Now it turned out that the... the paradox was that to
+make a computer easier to use you needed a more powerful
+
+132
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And so this computer that was easy to use was actually
+more powerful and could do more things than the less easy to
+
+133
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Actually there's a funny joke that we were clowning around
+one day. And one of our group is an IBM person. And so he was
+
+134
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+Where's... where's my metaphor.
+And we've gotten, we've... we've
+
+135
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well I think, I think the Macintosh was
+created by a group of people who felt that ah
+
+136
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+mathematics is really a liberal art if you
+look at it from a slightly different point of
+
+137
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+The balance between thinking and
+doing. I mean one of the things in
+
+138
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+I mean we're going back to '75.
+Well again after seeing... my entire
+
+139
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+been in it now for about fifteen
+years and I've seen a lot of people
+
+140
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+And my... my point of view on this, or my observation
+is that the doers are the major thinkers. The people
+
+141
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+if we really go back and we examine, you know did
+Leonardo have a guy off to the side that was thinking
+
+142
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+Leonardo was the artist but he also
+mixed all his own paints. He also
+
+143
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+And there is no difference in our industry. The people that
+have really made the contributions have been the thinkers
+
+144
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+The doing is more concrete. But somebody,
+it's very easy to say oh I thought of
+
+145
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+What's it going to take to make computers
+accessible to the rest of the public.
+
+146
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well probably death is the best invention of
+life. Ah because it means there's a constant
+
+147
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+educational system. So that you're ah, there
+are, there are now generations of people that have
+
+148
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+that ah at this point still have,
+have not embraced these things. Or
+
+149
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Going back...
+
+150
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+It's a harsh way of saying it but...
+
+151
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+It's very true. I mean there is a
+line that says those people that don't
+
+152
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+semiconductors and the vision is that
+IBM is this big machine, UNIVAC, big
+
+153
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And I actually got some great
+stuff from Ted Hoff about, you
+
+154
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Actually you know, it wasn't Intel that first figured out
+that the microprocessor was a computer. They designed these
+
+155
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+things to be used in
+calculators. And they thought, the
+
+156
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+if they could design a slightly programmable one, the next
+customer that walked in the door that wanted a slightly
+
+157
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+But I think the thought of making a computer never
+really occurred to them. And it was the hobbyists that
+
+158
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Ah and I don't think Intel quite
+understood that for a few years.
+
+159
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+these people who were interested
+in these small little computers.
+
+160
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+have you know worked with large
+computers ah were all gathered
+
+161
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+It was very exciting. And there
+was not a month that would not go by
+
+162
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+what did you think when you saw the Apple I?
+
+163
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+What did I think when I saw the Apple?
+
+164
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Yeah when you first saw that Woz was building that board.
+
+165
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well it didn't quite work that way
+actually. what happened was that Woz and I ah
+
+166
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+project together was we built these
+little blue boxes to ah make free telephone
+
+167
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+I don't think it works anymore. But ah
+we had, we had a fun time doing that. So
+
+168
+00:00:00,002 --> 00:00:00,002
+brilliant hardware engineer and focused
+on the core design of the computer. And
+
+169
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Now we made the, a very important decision was
+to not offer our computers a kit. Even though
+
+170
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+We were the first company in the
+world to do that. Everybody else
+
+171
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+And the Apple II was actually the first
+computer to come fully assembled where you
+
+172
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And if they didn't have to
+do anything with the hardware
+
+173
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Still there was a much larger group of
+people that could take advantage of this.
+
+174
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Contrast if you will the Atlantic City fair over the West Coast computer firm.
+
+175
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Ahm well the....
+the Atlantic City ah computer show was the first...
+[PAUSES] [
+Look at the light bulb.
+
+176
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+[SNEEZES] The ahm, the first an
+face to face gathering of personal
+
+177
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+So the basement, it was like a
+steambath. And it was impossible to
+
+178
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+There was a table tablecloth over a hotel table. And there were,
+Woz and I and a friend or two of our went there and we had our
+
+179
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+A year later, I think ah maybe even nine months later,
+there was the first West coast computer fair which was
+
+180
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+13,000.
+
+181
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+l3,000, wow, really.
+13,000 people.
+That's a lot.
+
+182
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Jim Warren told me that.
+
+183
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+That's a lot.
+I...I'd be surprised at that. But maybe.
+
+184
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Call it half that.
+6,000.
+
+185
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+6,000. Thousands of people.
+
+186
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Inbetween you went and found McKenna and Markkula?
+
+187
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well we found Regis by ahm, I used to
+like Intel's advertising. So I called
+
+188
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And I said what's Regis McKenna? He said no it's
+a person. He gave me his phone number and I called
+
+189
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+And then Mike Markkula I found
+ah from ah a venture capitalist
+
+190
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+we hooked up with Mike just around the time we introduced
+the Apple II. Maybe a month before. But the Apple II
+
+191
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+How important was the disk drive in the development of Apple?
+
+192
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Disk drive was crucial. Ah one of the things that people
+forget when they think about... about Apple and the Apple
+
+193
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+The Apple II could hold up to 48 kilobytes of memory
+which today doesn't seem like much, but at that time
+
+194
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+It was the only computer that could hold it. And so if Visicalc had
+been written for some other computer you'd be interviewing somebody
+
+195
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+How did the Apple II change the world of computing?
+
+196
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well the Apple II was the world's
+first successful personal computer.
+
+197
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+[END OF TAPE] One of the
+theses is that um ....
+
+198
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well you know I think in the early days it was
+very easy because you would go to a home group
+
+199
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+Now if you show them your product and see what they
+thought and you could because products were much
+
+200
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+But as the market got more sophisticated it
+was less easy to do that. And the problem is is
+
+201
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+Or it can tell you what your customers
+think of something you show them. Or it can
+
+202
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+your customers want as an incremental
+improvement on what you have but very rarely
+
+203
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+As an example no market research
+could have led to the development
+
+204
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+So there are these sort of non incremental jumps that
+need to take place where it's very difficult for market
+
+205
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+However once you have made that jump possibly
+before the products on the market or even after is a
+
+206
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+How has the personal
+computer changed society?
+
+207
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+I'm not the right person to ask.
+
+208
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well at the time when we started Apple
+um _____ was working for Hewlett Packard
+
+209
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+we we went through Atari and showed them
+our early protoypes and we went to HP
+
+210
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Probably for good reasons but ah we started a
+company because it was the only alternative left.
+
+211
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+when did you ever think that it was going
+to really this was really going to happen.
+
+212
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Oh it didn't take very long. It it happened for me when
+I saw people that could never possibly design a computer.
+
+213
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+What's the the goal of the the the next factory?
+why why is it so automated?
+Why is that necessary?
+
+214
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Um one could go on for a long time
+about how the US has forgotten about
+
+215
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And ah what we're finding is is that ah time to market is
+very important and quality is very important and the way
+
+216
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+there to lower the cost although it does do that it's
+really there to increase the quality and decrease the time
+
+217
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+So um we happen to be the lowest cost producer in
+the world already next of our class of products.
+
+218
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And we think for a company to survive much
+less prosper in the nineties that these
+
+219
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+[BACKGROUND DISCUSSION]
+What if computer networks offered education?
+
+220
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well ah education been on computer networks for longer then almost
+anyone else. The Department of Defense has an office called DARPA
+
+221
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And they did a very brilliant thing. After
+they got a prototype working they gave it to
+
+222
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+And that is tied together the research community of
+the United States now for about a decade. And it's
+
+223
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+That's why we started off focusing exclusively
+on higher education because where else could
+
+224
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+How about lower education?
+How about school?
+How about lower ....
+
+225
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Um sharing valuable resources. So far ah
+computer use in K-12 has been primarily Apple IIs.
+
+226
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+And ah I wish ah I wish that they'd be upgrading the MacIntosh's
+faster then they have been but I think ah I think that slowly
+
+227
+00:00:00,002 --> 00:00:00,002
+um there's been a bottle neck because there
+hasn't been enough sophisticated course wear
+
+228
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Easily.
+
+229
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+[BACKGROUND DISCUSSION]
+
+230
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Um actually we wanted to get the Mac out a year before we did
+so we had internal deadlines ah that we were not able to meet
+
+231
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+I love this this I don't want to call ______ this thing that
+you did was just have everybody sign the _______ that was great.
+
+232
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Um because the people that worked on it consider
+themselves and I certainly consider them artist.
+
+233
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+These are the people that under under different
+circumstances would be painters and poets but because of
+
+234
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+what was it like when you announced at the shareholders meeting?
+
+235
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Oh wow it was well I got the first few rows
+had all the people that worked on the Mac.
+
+236
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+About a hundred people. A hundred fifty people
+that really made it happen were all seated in the
+
+237
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+to people itself and things like that ah the
+whole auditorium of that twenty five hundred people
+
+238
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+All of us were just .... I was biting my
+tongue very hard because I had a little bit
+
+239
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,001
+From that day forward it was no longer
+ours. We couldn't change it. If we had a good
+
+240
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+[BACKGROUND NOISE]
+So what did you accomplish?
+what did you set out to do and what did you do?
+
+241
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well I think maybe it's something different
+along the lines then what you want to ......
+
+242
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Would you like to build a company or change the world?
+
+243
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Ah when we started Apple we were out to build computers for our friends.
+That was all No idea of a company.
+
+244
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+How important is a user interface in the design of a computer?
+
+245
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+Well the whole idea of the MacIntosh was a computer for people who want to use a computer rather then learn how to use a computer.
+
+246
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+So....One way we've been playing with it
+is it's not how it does it but what it does.
+
+247
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+[BACKGROUND DISCUSSION]
+Where are we in the evolution of the user interface?
+And where are we going?
+
+248
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+The whole discussion about user interface
+is just strange to me because to me it's
+
+249
+00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:00,000
+[BACKGROUND DISCUSSION]
+Um okay networking.
+Why is networking important?
+Why is it the future?
+

File steve_jobs_interview/failed/c.srt

+1
+00:00:00,001 --> 00:00:00,300
+Subtitle created via greatdreamers.sinaapp.com/youtubesubs
+
+2
+00:00:02,880 --> 00:00:09,619
+是一组的图象
+
+3
+00:00:09,619 --> 00:00:11,199
+有希望
+
+4
+00:00:11,199 --> 00:00:12,940
+在学校
+
+5
+00:00:12,940 --> 00:00:16,960
+此酒
+
+6
+00:00:16,960 --> 00:00:21,259
+通缉
+
+7
+00:00:21,259 --> 00:00:28,259
+为
+
+8
+00:00:32,369 --> 00:00:36,790
+最后
+
+9
+00:00:36,790 --> 00:00:39,800
+呃... 
+
+10
+00:00:39,800 --> 00:00:42,140
+圣卢西亚里奥
+
+11
+00:00:42,140 --> 00:00:49,140
+和
+
+12
+00:00:58,040 --> 00:01:01,269
+速度
+
+13
+00:01:01,270 --> 00:01:04,739
+什么是这个任务为什么坚持和销售的兴趣是什么
+
+14
+00:01:04,739 --> 00:01:11,430
+学生和影响力
+
+15
+00:01:11,430 --> 00:01:15,180
+你可能会
+
+16
+00:01:15,180 --> 00:01:19,640
+我记得读呃...杂志上的文章很长一段时间前
+
+17
+00:01:19,640 --> 00:01:20,900
+当我... 
+
+18
+00:01:20,900 --> 00:01:22,270
+ 12岁可能
+
+19
+00:01:22,270 --> 00:01:25,300
+邀请“科学美国人”我不知道
+
+20
+00:01:25,300 --> 00:01:27,200
+的文章呃... 
+
+21
+00:01:27,200 --> 00:01:30,390
+提出来测量运动的效率
+
+22
+00:01:30,390 --> 00:01:32,850
+为...很多物种
+
+23
+00:01:32,850 --> 00:01:33,720
+地球
+
+24
+00:01:33,720 --> 00:01:36,450
+看哪些品种是最有效的
+
+25
+00:01:36,450 --> 00:01:38,069
+在得到点a点到b 
+
+26
+00:01:38,069 --> 00:01:40,600
+呃...他们测量了杀手的热量
+
+27
+00:01:40,600 --> 00:01:41,919
+每一个支出
+
+28
+00:01:41,920 --> 00:01:43,810
+所以呃...引导他们所有
+
+29
+00:01:43,810 --> 00:01:46,070
+我还记得,嗯... 
+
+30
+00:01:46,070 --> 00:01:48,699
+呃...秃鹰想
+
+31
+00:01:48,700 --> 00:01:51,200
+卡特是最有效的
+
+32
+00:01:51,200 --> 00:01:53,390
+获得从a点到b点
+
+33
+00:01:53,390 --> 00:01:57,659
+和人类行为的人群创造的,而给人印象不深的表现
+
+34
+00:01:57,659 --> 00:01:59,939
+有一个唤醒列表
+
+35
+00:01:59,939 --> 00:02:01,759
+所以呃... 
+
+36
+00:02:01,760 --> 00:02:04,290
+没有那么伟大
+
+37
+00:02:04,290 --> 00:02:05,439
+但是,呃... 
+
+38
+00:02:05,439 --> 00:02:08,399
+让我来决定
+
+39
+00:02:08,399 --> 00:02:15,399
+阶段,但
+
+40
+00:02:16,079 --> 00:02:17,319
+我记得有一个
+
+41
+00:02:17,319 --> 00:02:21,108
+看过一篇文章,是大约12年的历史,我认为这可能“科学美国人” 
+
+42
+00:02:21,109 --> 00:02:25,249
+他们测量了所有物种的行星的运动效率
+
+43
+00:02:25,249 --> 00:02:28,059
+地球呃...未来的热量,直到他们希望得到从A点到点
+
+44
+00:02:28,059 --> 00:02:29,039
+ b 
+
+45
+00:02:29,039 --> 00:02:31,039
+安迪·卡或
+
+46
+00:02:31,039 --> 00:02:33,279
+呃...开曼民粹主义
+
+47
+00:02:33,279 --> 00:02:37,059
+超过一切在人类中大约有三分之一的方式下
+
+48
+00:02:37,059 --> 00:02:40,899
+列表这是这样一个伟大的生育表现为
+
+49
+00:02:40,899 --> 00:02:44,969
+和...但有人有想象力
+
+50
+00:02:44,969 --> 00:02:47,948
+测试的效率的人权自行车
+
+51
+00:02:47,949 --> 00:02:51,560
+人的权利,卫浴设备,热水器,厨房设备,餐厨用具,娄方式的秃鹰,我们有赤裸上身
+
+52
+00:02:51,560 --> 00:02:54,049
+安妮特作出了非常大的给我的印象
+
+53
+00:02:54,049 --> 00:02:56,539
+我们人类是真正的建设者
+
+54
+00:02:56,539 --> 00:02:59,069
+而我们却时尚的工具, 
+
+55
+00:02:59,069 --> 00:03:04,659
+放大容易遗传法案是,我们有壮观的幅度
+
+56
+00:03:04,659 --> 00:03:08,790
+所以我的电脑一直是骑自行车的心态
+
+57
+00:03:08,790 --> 00:03:09,569
+呃...东西
+
+58
+00:03:09,569 --> 00:03:12,929
+将我们远远超出了我们的继承bilities 
+
+59
+00:03:12,930 --> 00:03:14,160
+和... 
+
+60
+00:03:14,160 --> 00:03:17,849
+我想工作的早期阶段,这
+
+61
+00:03:17,849 --> 00:03:19,349
+非常早期阶段
+
+62
+00:03:19,349 --> 00:03:22,369
+我们已经来将是一个很短的距离
+
+63
+00:03:22,369 --> 00:03:25,669
+它仍然是在它的形成已经看到了巨大的变化,我认为,我们已经
+
+64
+00:03:25,669 --> 00:03:30,189
+没有什么比接下来会发生什么百年
+
+65
+00:03:30,189 --> 00:03:33,739
+看看一些白色的人在过去的预测方案6 
+
+66
+00:03:33,739 --> 00:03:35,909
+舞蹈对未来的错误
+
+67
+00:03:35,909 --> 00:03:39,858
+的概念之一是它今天的分工,一个独立的计算机
+
+68
+00:03:39,859 --> 00:03:42,269
+那些过去的​​有限绳之以法
+
+69
+00:03:42,269 --> 00:03:44,709
+愿景,在公园脊呃... 
+
+70
+00:03:44,709 --> 00:03:50,519
+这样的区别是什么网络之间的机器,而不是软化
+
+71
+00:03:50,519 --> 00:03:54,159
+让我问这个问题略有不同
+
+72
+00:03:54,159 --> 00:03:55,349
+有再
+
+73
+00:03:55,349 --> 00:03:57,069
+如果你看看为什么
+
+74
+00:03:57,069 --> 00:04:00,539
+大多数人都买了这些东西,所以
+
+75
+00:04:00,539 --> 00:04:01,500
+呃... 
+
+76
+00:04:01,500 --> 00:04:05,839
+欧洲真正的爆炸,推动了行业的
+
+77
+00:04:05,839 --> 00:04:09,789
+第一个呃...真的发生了一九七七年
+
+78
+00:04:09,789 --> 00:04:11,379
+并且它是电子表格
+
+79
+00:04:11,379 --> 00:04:15,239
+我还记得恩...凹痕文件斯特拉顿跑市场的公司, 
+
+80
+00:04:15,239 --> 00:04:18,039
+电子表格走进我的办公室,苹果和
+
+81
+00:04:18,039 --> 00:04:20,829
+拉出此光盘
+
+82
+00:04:20,829 --> 00:04:24,469
+马甲的口袋里,所以II有这个令人难以置信的新程序,我把它称为一种视觉的
+
+83
+00:04:24,469 --> 00:04:25,939
+计算器
+
+84
+00:04:25,939 --> 00:04:27,269
+变得忙碌CAL 
+
+85
+00:04:27,269 --> 00:04:31,689
+和真正巡逻推动了苹果嘟嘟成功
+
+86
+00:04:31,689 --> 00:04:33,179
+转移实现
+
+87
+00:04:33,179 --> 00:04:38,400
+比其他任何一个事件,呃...发明了莲花
+
+88
+00:04:38,400 --> 00:04:41,400
+一二三,我认为这是一九八二年,真正推动
+
+89
+00:04:41,400 --> 00:04:43,029
+在i_b_m_p_c_ 
+
+90
+00:04:43,029 --> 00:04:45,819
+成功的水平是主要的
+
+91
+00:04:45,819 --> 00:04:48,729
+所以这是第一次爆炸是电子表格呃... 
+
+92
+00:04:48,729 --> 00:04:49,580
+第二
+
+93
+00:04:49,580 --> 00:04:51,449
+主要驱动爆炸艺术
+
+94
+00:04:51,449 --> 00:04:58,449
+在桌面业一直是桌面出版
+
+95
+00:05:00,050 --> 00:05:07,050
+在恩... 
+
+96
+00:05:07,769 --> 00:05:13,430
+马纳萨斯可能是广播纹理的
+
+97
+00:05:13,430 --> 00:05:15,529
+纠正BC 
+
+98
+00:05:15,529 --> 00:05:18,099
+公司竞争的专业知识还行
+
+99
+00:05:18,099 --> 00:05:19,580
+戏剧化
+
+100
+00:05:19,580 --> 00:05:23,779
+得到专家的态度
+
+101
+00:05:23,779 --> 00:05:27,489
+我们的客人市场,你认为问题在哪里
+
+102
+00:05:27,489 --> 00:05:33,058
+说明
+
+103
+00:05:33,059 --> 00:05:34,379
+完成,第二
+
+104
+00:05:34,379 --> 00:05:35,539
+冲浪
+
+105
+00:05:35,539 --> 00:05:37,979
+呃...第二在艺术上真正的大爆炸
+
+106
+00:05:37,979 --> 00:05:40,039
+她的行业是桌面出版
+
+107
+00:05:40,039 --> 00:05:43,669
+发生在1983年的Macintosh五,请阅读祈祷
+
+108
+00:05:43,669 --> 00:05:47,789
+在这一点上,人们可以开始做桌面上的蜇伤,只有
+
+109
+00:05:47,789 --> 00:05:51,310
+类型制定者和打印机,您可以在此之前,这很好
+
+110
+00:05:51,310 --> 00:05:53,740
+威尔第的革命出版
+
+111
+00:05:53,740 --> 00:05:57,669
+而这些都是真的,那些发生两起爆炸是唯一的统治
+
+112
+00:05:57,669 --> 00:05:59,810
+它的成本的重大革命
+
+113
+00:05:59,810 --> 00:06:04,100
+更有很多人买这些东西
+
+114
+00:06:04,100 --> 00:06:06,620
+第三个是现在开始出现
+
+115
+00:06:06,620 --> 00:06:08,319
+和第三个是
+
+116
+00:06:08,319 --> 00:06:11,899
+让我们做人类第一次人际交往
+
+117
+00:06:11,899 --> 00:06:14,449
+什么样的电子表格更严厉的财务规划
+
+118
+00:06:14,449 --> 00:06:18,069
+什么是公共桌面出版发布什么的革命性的
+
+119
+00:06:18,069 --> 00:06:20,210
+使用这些桌面设备
+
+120
+00:06:20,210 --> 00:06:23,090
+我们已经开始看到的迹象
+
+121
+00:06:23,090 --> 00:06:26,399
+在一个组织作为一个例子
+
+122
+00:06:26,399 --> 00:06:28,240
+我们开始认识到, 
+
+123
+00:06:28,240 --> 00:06:30,699
+业务条件的变化
+
+124
+00:06:30,699 --> 00:06:33,239
+越来越快每年
+
+125
+00:06:33,239 --> 00:06:34,049
+呃... 
+
+126
+00:06:34,050 --> 00:06:36,849
+我们不能改变我们的管理
+
+127
+00:06:36,849 --> 00:06:40,069
+分层组织非常快相对于不断变化的业务
+
+128
+00:06:40,069 --> 00:06:40,930
+条件
+
+129
+00:06:40,930 --> 00:06:44,799
+我们不能是一个新的老板每周工作
+
+130
+00:06:44,799 --> 00:06:48,369
+我们也可以改变你的地理组织非常快的影响,甚至
+
+131
+00:06:48,369 --> 00:06:52,219
+慢于管理,我们不能在全国各地的人们
+
+132
+00:06:52,219 --> 00:06:53,569
+每周
+
+133
+00:06:53,569 --> 00:06:56,909
+但我们可以改变电子组织
+
+134
+00:06:56,909 --> 00:06:58,229
+这样的
+
+135
+00:06:58,229 --> 00:07:01,539
+开始发生的一切,当我们开始将这些计算机连接在一起, 
+
+136
+00:07:01,539 --> 00:07:05,180
+出色的用户界面的复杂的网络
+
+137
+00:07:05,180 --> 00:07:07,659
+我们开始能够创建
+
+138
+00:07:07,659 --> 00:07:10,670
+集群工作的人一个共同的任务
+
+139
+00:07:10,670 --> 00:07:14,619
+在SPEEDO字面上的价值在十五分钟内
+
+140
+00:07:14,619 --> 00:07:17,609
+和他的15人可以一起工作非常正式,无论
+
+141
+00:07:17,609 --> 00:07:22,279
+他们在地理上的不管是谁,他们的工作层次
+
+142
+00:07:22,279 --> 00:07:27,610
+这些组织生活,只要他们需要在他们
+
+143
+00:07:27,610 --> 00:07:30,919
+都很好,我们可以重新组织我们的公司
+
+144
+00:07:30,919 --> 00:07:32,279
+电子
+
+145
+00:07:32,279 --> 00:07:35,300
+呃...非常迅速,这是唯一的类型
+
+146
+00:07:35,300 --> 00:07:38,520
+组织,可以开始跟上不断变化的业务
+
+147
+00:07:38,520 --> 00:07:39,830
+条件
+
+148
+00:07:39,830 --> 00:07:43,080
+我认为,这一合作模式已经存在
+
+149
+00:07:43,080 --> 00:07:45,099
+很长一段时间的高等教育
+
+150
+00:07:45,099 --> 00:07:48,270
+但我们开始看到它应用到商业世界的
+
+151
+00:07:48,270 --> 00:07:52,180
+这将是第三次重大革命台式电脑
+
+152
+00:07:52,180 --> 00:07:53,139
+提供
+
+153
+00:07:53,139 --> 00:07:56,740
+是革命性的人到人的通信组的工作
+
+154
+00:07:56,740 --> 00:07:58,789
+我们把它称为人际计算
+
+155
+00:07:58,789 --> 00:08:01,308
+在1983年做个人电脑
+
+156
+00:08:01,309 --> 00:08:04,869
+呃...现在我们要扩大我们的网络东边的东西,是人际交往
+
+157
+00:08:04,869 --> 00:08:07,889
+计算
+
+158
+00:08:07,889 --> 00:08:09,289
+ Ç 
+
+159
+00:08:09,289 --> 00:08:10,580
+究竟是什么形象
+
+160
+00:08:10,580 --> 00:08:12,568
+的计算机
+
+161
+00:08:12,569 --> 00:08:16,189
+在19世纪中叶六十年代,或任何你第一次看到了什么
+
+162
+00:08:16,189 --> 00:08:17,749
+和我们现在
+
+163
+00:08:17,749 --> 00:08:21,849
+是什么,嗯...如何在PC中类似的变化
+
+164
+00:08:21,849 --> 00:08:22,990
+ r_e_m_ 
+
+165
+00:08:22,990 --> 00:08:29,990
+我是12岁的时候,我第一次看到我的钱包电脑
+
+166
+00:08:30,150 --> 00:08:32,709
+我看到显微镜单位12 
+
+167
+00:08:32,710 --> 00:08:37,020
+是不是NASA我们有当地的美国航空航天局中心附近
+
+168
+00:08:37,020 --> 00:08:38,509
+ ,它是一个终端
+
+169
+00:08:38,509 --> 00:08:39,820
+它被连接到一个大
+
+170
+00:08:39,820 --> 00:08:42,770
+计算机的某个地方,我得到了分时计数
+
+171
+00:08:42,770 --> 00:08:47,020
+和我迷上了它,我看到了我的第二台计算机,几年后, 
+
+172
+00:08:47,020 --> 00:08:47,710
+是
+
+173
+00:08:47,710 --> 00:08:51,290
+真的是有史以来的第一台台式电脑,但惠普
+
+174
+00:08:51,290 --> 00:08:53,150
+头骨的91百天
+
+175
+00:08:53,150 --> 00:08:55,329
+和每一个希望的语言基础
+
+176
+00:08:55,330 --> 00:08:57,000
+这是非常大的
+
+177
+00:08:57,000 --> 00:08:58,500
+我有一个非常小
+
+178
+00:08:58,500 --> 00:09:00,630
+资本的几个买了它的显示
+
+179
+00:09:00,630 --> 00:09:02,990
+我有机会一起玩其中的一个
+
+180
+00:09:02,990 --> 00:09:05,120
+也许在一九六八年
+
+181
+00:09:05,120 --> 00:09:06,070
+或9 
+
+182
+00:09:06,070 --> 00:09:10,670
+和...备用度过的每一刻,我曾试图这么写程序
+
+183
+00:09:10,670 --> 00:09:14,459
+它迷住了
+
+184
+00:09:14,460 --> 00:09:16,630
+所以我可能是相当幸运
+
+185
+00:09:16,630 --> 00:09:20,710
+在我介绍电脑非常迅速地从trummel移动的
+
+186
+00:09:20,710 --> 00:09:21,880
+呃... 
+
+187
+00:09:21,880 --> 00:09:25,999
+到也许12个月内,所以实际上看到的赢得了第一
+
+188
+00:09:25,999 --> 00:09:28,280
+ probly是国内第一款桌面电脑
+
+189
+00:09:28,280 --> 00:09:30,290
+真正预测生产
+
+190
+00:09:30,290 --> 00:09:31,800
+和... 
+
+191
+00:09:31,800 --> 00:09:33,939
+所以我的观点,你从来没有真正改变
+
+192
+00:09:33,940 --> 00:09:37,130
+即使册封为真福搂着我的波莉姨妈相当痛苦的, 
+
+193
+00:09:37,130 --> 00:09:40,670
+我们的人
+
+194
+00:09:40,670 --> 00:09:42,618
+究竟是什么角色,我们将有
+
+195
+00:09:42,619 --> 00:09:45,200
+个人电脑团队
+
+196
+00:09:45,200 --> 00:09:47,200
+景观的
+
+197
+00:09:47,200 --> 00:09:48,260
+电脑的我
+
+198
+00:09:48,260 --> 00:09:51,370
+这是权力集中是一个了不起的现在,我们的三倍
+
+199
+00:09:51,370 --> 00:09:52,279
+大的权力
+
+200
+00:09:52,279 --> 00:09:57,170
+在参议院的朋友,我们有5倍多过去影响
+
+201
+00:09:57,170 --> 00:10:00,699
+现在另一个利益
+
+202
+00:10:00,700 --> 00:10:07,700