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youngs  committed 5852416

2003-04-30 Steve Youngs <youngs@xemacs.org>

* mh-e.texi: Drop back to the latest released version of this
file.

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+2003-04-30  Steve Youngs  <youngs@xemacs.org>
+
+	* mh-e.texi: Drop back to the latest released version of this
+	file. 
+
 2003-04-29  Norbert Koch  <viteno@xemacs.org>
 
 	* Makefile (VERSION): XEmacs package 1.20 released.

File mh-e.texi

View file
 \input texinfo   @c -*-texinfo-*-
 @c $Id$
 @c %**start of header
-@setfilename info/mh-e
+@setfilename ../info/mh-e
 @settitle mh-e
 @c %**end of header
 
 @end direntry
 
 @c Version variables.
-@set EDITION 2.0
-@set VERSION 6.0
-@set UPDATED 25 December 2001
-@set UPDATE-MONTH December 2001
-
-@c Other variables.
-@set MH-BOOK-HOME http://www.ics.uci.edu/~mh/book
+@set EDITION 1.3
+@set VERSION 5.0.2
+@set UPDATED 18 February 2001
+@set UPDATE-MONTH February 2001
 
 @ifinfo
 This is Edition @value{EDITION}, last updated @value{UPDATED}, of
-@cite{MH-E, The Emacs Interface to MH}, for MH-E, Version
+@cite{mh-e, The Emacs Interface to MH}, for mh-e, Version
 @value{VERSION}.
 
-Copyright 1995, 2001, 2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+Copyright 1995, 2001 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
 Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
 under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or
 @end ifinfo
 
 @titlepage
-@title MH-E - The Emacs Interface to MH
-@subtitle Edition @value{EDITION} for MH-E Version @value{VERSION}
-@subtitle @value{UPDATE-MONTH}
-@author Bill Wohler
+@sp 10
+@center @titlefont{mh-e}
+@sp 2
+@center The Emacs Interface to MH
+@sp 2
+@center by Bill Wohler
+@sp 2
+@center Edition @value{EDITION} for mh-e Version @value{VERSION}
+@sp 2
+@center @value{UPDATE-MONTH}
 
 @page
 @vskip 0pt plus 1filll
-Copyright @copyright{} 1995, 2001, 2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
+Copyright @copyright{} 1995, 2001 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
 
 Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document
 under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or
 @ifinfo
 @node Top, Preface, (dir), (dir)
 @top MH and Emacs
-This is Edition @value{EDITION} of @cite{MH-E, The Emacs Interface to
-MH}, last updated @value{UPDATED} for MH-E Version @value{VERSION}.
+This is Edition @value{EDITION} of @cite{mh-e, The Emacs Interface to
+MH}, last updated @value{UPDATED} for mh-e Version @value{VERSION}.
 
 @menu
-* Preface::                     Introduction to MH-E.
-* Tour Through MH-E::           Use MH-E quickly!
-* Using MH-E::                  The MH-E manual proper.
-* Odds and Ends::               Getting MH-E, reporting bugs, mailing
+* Preface::                     Introduction to mh-e.
+* Tour Through mh-e::           Use mh-e quickly!
+* Using mh-e::                  Documentation for all commands.
+* Customizing mh-e::            Documentation for all variables.
+* Odds and Ends::               Getting mh-e, reporting bugs, mailing
                                 list and FAQ.
 * History::                     The authors speak up!
 * Copying::                     The GNU General Public License
 * Command Index::               
 * Variable Index::              
 * Concept Index::               
-
-@detailmenu
- --- The Detailed Node Listing ---
-
-Tour Through MH-E
-
-* Conventions::                 GNU Emacs Terms and Conventions
-* Getting Started::             
-* Sending Mail Tour::           
-* Reading Mail Tour::           
-* Processing Mail Tour::        
-* Leaving MH-E::                
-* More About MH-E::             
-
-Using MH-E
-
-* Reading Mail::                
-* Sending Mail::                
-* Draft Editing::               
-* Moving Mail::                 
-* Searching::                   
-* Sequences::                   
-* Miscellaneous::               
-
-Reading Your Mail
-
-* Viewing::                     
-* Moving Around::               
-
-Viewing Your Mail
-
-* Reading Digests::             
-* Reading MIME::                
-
-Sending Mail
-
-* Replying::                    
-* Forwarding::                  
-* Redistributing::              
-* Old Drafts::                  
-
-Editing a Draft
-
-* Editing Textual::             
-* Editing MIME::                
-* Sending Message::             
-* Killing Draft::               
-
-Editing Textual Messages
-
-* Inserting Letter::            
-* Inserting Messages::          
-* Header::                      
-* Recipients::                  
-* Signature::                   
-
-Editing Multimedia Messages
-
-* Forwarding MIME::             
-* FTP::                         
-* Tar::                         
-* Other MIME Objects::          
-* Sending MIME::                
-
-Moving Your Mail Around
-
-* Incorporating::               
-* Deleting::                    
-* Organizing::                  
-* Printing::                    
-* Files and Pipes::             
-* Scan Line Formats::           
-* Finishing Up::                
-
-Odds and Ends
-
-* Bug Reports::                 
-* Mailing List::                
-* MH FAQ::                      
-* Getting MH-E::                
-
-History of MH-E
-
-* From Brian Reid::             
-* From Jim Larus::              
-* From Stephen Gildea::         
-
-@end detailmenu
 @end menu
-
 @end ifinfo
 
-@node Preface, Tour Through MH-E, Top, Top
+@node Preface, Tour Through mh-e, Top, Top
 @unnumbered Preface
 
 @cindex Emacs
 @cindex Unix commands, Emacs
 
 These chapters introduce another interface to MH that is accessible
-through the GNU Emacs editor, namely, @emph{MH-E}. MH-E is easy to
-use. I don't assume that you know GNU Emacs or even MH at this point,
-since I didn't know either of them when I discovered MH-E. However,
-MH-E was the tip of the iceberg, and I discovered more and more
-niceties about GNU Emacs and MH@. Now I'm fully hooked on both of
-them.
+through the GNU Emacs editor, namely, @emph{mh-e}.  mh-e is easy to use.
+I don't assume that you know GNU Emacs or even MH at this point, since I
+didn't know either of them when I discovered mh-e.  However, mh-e was
+the tip of the iceberg, and I discovered more and more niceties about
+GNU Emacs and MH@.  Now I'm fully hooked on both of them.
 
 @cindex history
 
-The MH-E package is distributed with GNU Emacs, @footnote{Note that
-MH-E is supported with MH 6 and @w{Emacs 18} through @w{Emacs 21}.
+The mh-e package is distributed with GNU Emacs, @footnote{Note that
+mh-e is supported with MH 6 and @w{Emacs 18} through @w{Emacs 21}.
 Reportedly, large parts of it work with @w{MH 5} and also with
 Lucid/XEmacs and Epoch, but there are no guarantees. It is also
 distributed with Lucid/XEmacs, as well as with MH itself.} so you
 shouldn't have to do anything special to use it. But it's important to
-note a brief history of MH-E. @w{Version 3} was prevalent through the
+note a brief history of mh-e. @w{Version 3} was prevalent through the
 @w{Emacs 18} and early @w{Emacs 19} years. Then @w{Version 4} came out
 (@w{Emacs 19.23}), which introduced several new and changed commands.
 Finally, @w{Version 5.0} was released, which fixed some bugs and
-incompatibilities, and was incorporated into @w{Emacs 19.29}. Finally,
-development was rekindled on SourceForge which resulted in menus and
-buttons in version 6.0 and Emacs 21.2. This is the version covered by
-this manual. @ref{Getting Started} will help you decide which version
-you have.
+incompatibilities, and was incorporated into @w{Emacs 19.29}. This is
+the version covered by this manual. @ref{Getting Started} will help
+you decide which version you have.
 
 If you don't already use GNU Emacs but want to learn more, you can read
 an online tutorial by starting GNU Emacs and typing @kbd{C-h t}
 the individual MH commands.  When the name is not obvious, I'll guide
 you to a relevant MH manual page that describes the action more fully.
 
-If you are reading this within Emacs or @command{info}, you may be
-interested in the online versions of
-@uref{http://www.ics.uci.edu/~mh/book/mh-e/, this document} as well as
-@uref{http://www.ics.uci.edu/~mh/book/, @cite{MH & nmh: Email for
-Users & Programmers}} (also known as the @dfn{MH book}). Likewise, if
-you are reading this online, you might be interested to know that the
-MH-E manual is also distributed with Emacs.
-
 I hope you enjoy these chapters!  If you have any comments, or
 suggestions for this document, please let me know.
 
 Bill Wohler <@i{wohler@@newt.com}>@*
 8 February 1995
 
-@node Tour Through MH-E, Using MH-E, Preface, Top
-@chapter Tour Through MH-E
+@node    Tour Through mh-e, Using mh-e, Preface, Top
+@chapter Tour Through mh-e
 
 This chapter introduces some of the terms you'll need to know and then
-takes you on a tour of MH-E. @footnote{The keys mentioned in these
-chapters refer to the default key bindings. If you've changed the
-bindings, refer to the command summaries at the beginning of each
-major section in @ref{Using MH-E}, for a mapping between default key
-bindings and function names.} When you're done, you'll be able to
-send, read, and file mail, which is all that a lot of people ever do.
-But if you're the curious or adventurous type, you'll read @ref{Using
-MH-E} to be able to use all the features of MH-E. I suggest you read
-this chapter first to get the big picture, and then you can read the
-manual as you wish.
+takes you on a tour of mh-e. @footnote{The keys mentioned in these
+chapters refer to the default key bindings.  If you've changed the
+bindings, refer to the command summaries at the beginning of each major
+section in @ref{Using mh-e}, for a mapping between default key bindings
+and function names.}  When you're done, you'll be able to send, read,
+and file mail, which is all that a lot of people ever do.  But if you're
+the curious type, you'll read @ref{Using mh-e} to be able to use all
+the features of mh-e.  If you're the adventurous type, you'll read
+@ref{Customizing mh-e} to make mh-e do what you want.  I suggest you
+read this chapter first to get the big picture, and then you can read
+the other two as you wish.
 
 @menu
 * Conventions::                 GNU Emacs Terms and Conventions
 * Sending Mail Tour::           
 * Reading Mail Tour::           
 * Processing Mail Tour::        
-* Leaving MH-E::                
-* More About MH-E::             
+* Leaving mh-e::                
+* More About mh-e::             
 @end menu
 
-@node Conventions, Getting Started, Tour Through MH-E, Tour Through MH-E
+@node Conventions, Getting Started, Tour Through mh-e, Tour Through mh-e
 @section GNU Emacs Terms and Conventions
 
 @cindex Emacs, terms and conventions
 
 If you're an experienced Emacs user, you can skip the following
 conventions and definition of terms and go directly to @ref{Getting
-Started} below.
-
-In general, @dfn{functions} in this text refer to Emacs Lisp functions
-that one would call from within Emacs Lisp programs (for example,
-@code{(mh-inc-folder)}). On the other hand, @dfn{commands} are those
-things that are run by the user, such as @kbd{i} or @kbd{M-x
-mh-inc-folder}. Programs outside of Emacs are specifically called MH
-commands, shell commands, or Unix commands.
-
-The conventions for key names are as follows:
+Started} below.  The conventions are as follows:
 
 @table @kbd
 @item C-x
 Hold down the @key{META} or @key{ALT} key and press the @kbd{x} key.
 
 Since some keyboards don't have a @key{META} key, you can generate
-@kbd{M-x}, for example, by pressing @key{ESC} (Escape),
-@emph{releasing it}, @footnote{This is emphasized because pressing ESC
-twice or holding it down a second too long so that it repeats gives
-you an error message.} and then pressing the @kbd{x} key.
+@kbd{M-x}, for example, by pressing @key{ESC} (Escape), @emph{releasing
+it}, @footnote{This is emphasized because pressing ESC twice or holding
+it down a second too long so that it repeats gives you an error message.}
+and then pressing the @kbd{x} key.
 @item RET
-Press the @key{RETURN} or @key{ENTER} key. This is normally used to
+Press the @key{RETURN} or @key{ENTER} key.  This is normally used to
 complete a command.
 @item SPC
 Press the space bar.
 @cindex prefix argument
 
 A @dfn{prefix argument} allows you to pass an argument to any Emacs
-function. To pass an argument, type @kbd{C-u} before the Emacs command
-or keystroke. Numeric arguments can be passed as well. For example, to
-insert five f's, use @kbd{C-u 5 f}. There is a default of four when
+function.  To pass an argument, type @kbd{C-u} before the Emacs command
+or keystroke.  Numeric arguments can be passed as well.  For example, to
+insert five f's, use @kbd{C-u 5 f}.  There is a default of four when
 using @kbd{C-u}, and you can use multiple prefix arguments to provide
-arguments of powers of four. To continue our example, you could insert
+arguments of powers of four.  To continue our example, you could insert
 four f's with @kbd{C-u f}, 16 f's with @kbd{C-u C-u f}, 64 f's with
-@kbd{C-u C-u C-u f}, and so on. Numeric and valueless negative
-arguments can also be inserted with the @key{META} key. Examples
+@kbd{C-u C-u C-u f}, and so on.  Numeric and valueless negative
+arguments can also be inserted with the @key{META} key.  Examples
 include @kbd{M-5} to specify an argument of 5, or @kbd{M--} which
 specifies a negative argument with no particular value.
 
-@sp 1
+@sp 2
+@need 1000
 @center @strong{NOTE}
 
 @quotation
-The prefix @kbd{C-u} or @kbd{M-} is not necessary in MH-E's MH-Folder
-mode (@pxref{Reading Mail Tour}). In this mode, simply enter the
+The prefix @kbd{C-u} or @kbd{M-} is not necessary in mh-e's MH-Folder
+modes (@pxref{Reading Mail Tour}).  In these modes, simply enter the
 numerical argument before entering the command.
 @end quotation
 
-@sp 1
-
-@findex @code{customize-option}
-@findex @code{customize-group}
-
-Variables in MH-E that can normally be modified by the user are called
-@dfn{options} and are modified through the customize functions (such
-as @kbd{M-x customize-option} or @kbd{M-x customize-group}).
-
-There are, however, a few @dfn{variables} that you may wish to change
-which are modified via the @code{setq} function rather than through
-the customize interface.
-
 @cindex point
 @cindex Emacs, point
 @cindex mark
 @cindex Emacs, region
 
 There are several other terms that are used in Emacs that you should
-know. The @dfn{point} is where the cursor currently is. You can save
-your current place in the file by setting a @dfn{mark}. This operation
-is useful in several ways. The mark can be later used when defining a
-@dfn{region}, which is the text between the point and mark. Many
-commands operate on regions, such as those for deleting text or
-filling paragraphs. A mark can be set with @kbd{C-@@} (or
-@kbd{C-SPC}).
+know.  The @dfn{point} is where the cursor currently is.  You can save
+your current place in the file by setting a @dfn{mark}.  This operation
+is useful in several ways.  The mark can be later used when defining a
+@dfn{region}, which is the text between the point and mark.  Many
+commands operate on regions, such as those for deleting text or filling
+paragraphs.  A mark can be set with @kbd{C-@@} (or @kbd{C-SPC}).
 
 @cindex minibuffer
 @cindex Emacs, minibuffer
 @cindex Emacs, file completion
 
 The @dfn{minibuffer} is the bottom line of the Emacs window, where all
-prompting and multiple-character input is directed. If you are
-prompted for information in the minibuffer, such as a filename, Emacs
-can help you complete your answer if you type @key{SPC} or @key{TAB}.
-A second @key{SPC} or @key{TAB} will list all possibilities at that
-point. The minibuffer is also where you enter Emacs function names
-after typing @kbd{M-x}. For example, in the preface, I
-mentioned that you could obtain help with @kbd{C-h t}
-(@code{help-with-tutorial}). What this means is that you can get a
-tutorial by typing either @kbd{C-h t} or @kbd{M-x help-with-tutorial}.
-In the latter case, you are prompted for @samp{help-with-tutorial} in
-the minibuffer after typing @kbd{M-x}.
+prompting and multiple-character input is directed.  If you are prompted
+for information in the minibuffer, such as a filename, Emacs can help
+you complete your answer if you type @key{SPC} or @key{TAB}.  A second
+@key{SPC} or @key{TAB} will list all possibilities at that point.  The
+minibuffer is also where you enter Emacs function names after typing
+@kbd{M-x}.  For example, in the first paragraph, I mentioned that you
+could obtain help with @kbd{C-h t} (@code{help-with-tutorial}).  What
+this means is that you can get a tutorial by typing either @kbd{C-h t}
+or @kbd{M-x help-with-tutorial}.  In the latter case, you are prompted
+for @samp{help-with-tutorial} in the minibuffer after typing @kbd{M-x}.
 
 @cindex interrupting
 @cindex Emacs, interrupting
 @cindex Emacs, quitting
 
 @i{In case of trouble:} Emacs can be interrupted at any time with
-@kbd{C-g}. For example, if you've started a command that requests that
+@kbd{C-g}.  For example, if you've started a command that requests that
 you enter something in the minibuffer, but then you change your mind,
-type @kbd{C-g} and you'll be back where you started. If you want to
+type @kbd{C-g} and you'll be back where you started.  If you want to
 exit Emacs entirely, use @kbd{C-x C-c}.
 
-@node Getting Started, Sending Mail Tour, Conventions, Tour Through MH-E
+@node Getting Started, Sending Mail Tour, Conventions, Tour Through mh-e
 @section Getting Started
 
-Because there are many old versions of MH-E out there, it is important
-to know which version you have. I'll be talking about @w{Version 6}
-which differs from @w{Version 4} and @w{Version 5} and is vastly
-different from @w{Version 3}.
-
-First, enter @kbd{M-x load-library @key{RET} MH-E @key{RET}}.
-@footnote{You wouldn't ordinarily do this.} The message, @samp{Loading
-mh-e...done}, should be displayed in the minibuffer. If you get
-@samp{Cannot open load file: mh-e}, then your Emacs is very badly
-configured, or MH-E is missing. You may wish to have your system
-administrator install a new Emacs or at least the latest MH-E files.
-
-Having loaded MH-E successfully, enter @kbd{M-x mh-version @key{RET}}.
-The version of MH-E should be displayed. Hopefully it says that you're
+Because there are many old versions of mh-e out there, it is important to
+know which version you have.  I'll be talking about @w{Version 5} which
+is similar to @w{Version 4} and vastly different from @w{Version 3}.
+
+First, enter @kbd{M-x load-library @key{RET} mh-e
+@key{RET}}. @footnote{You wouldn't ordinarily do this.}  The message,
+@samp{Loading mh-e...done}, should be displayed in the minibuffer.  If
+you get @samp{Cannot open load file: mh-e}, then your Emacs is very
+badly configured, or mh-e is missing.  You may wish to have your system
+administrator install a new Emacs or at least the latest mh-e files.
+
+Having loaded mh-e successfully, enter @kbd{M-x mh-version @key{RET}}.
+The version of mh-e should be displayed.  Hopefully it says that you're
 running @w{Version @value{VERSION}} which is the latest version as of
-this printing. If instead Emacs beeps and says @samp{[No match]}, then
-you're running a old version of MH-E.
-
-If these tests reveal a non-existent or old version of MH-E, please
-consider obtaining a new version. You can have your system
+this printing.  If instead Emacs beeps and says @samp{[No match]}, then
+you're running an old version of mh-e.
+
+If these tests reveal a non-existent or old version of mh-e, please
+consider obtaining a new version.  You can have your system
 administrator upgrade the system-wide version, or you can install your
-own personal version. It's really quite easy; instructions for getting
-and installing MH-E are in @ref{Getting MH-E}.
-
-@cindex @command{install-mh}
-@cindex MH commands, @command{install-mh}
-
-Also, older versions of MH-E assumed that you had already set up your
-MH environment. @footnote{See the section
-@uref{@value{MH-BOOK-HOME}/setup.htm, Setting Up MH} in the MH book.}
-Newer versions set up a new MH environment for you by running
-@command{install-mh} and notifying you of this fact with the message
-in a temporary buffer:
+own personal version.  It's really quite easy; instructions for getting
+and installing mh-e are in @ref{Getting mh-e}.
+
+@cindex @code{install-mh}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{install-mh}
+
+Also, older versions of mh-e assumed that you had already set up your MH
+environment.  Newer versions set up a new MH environment for you by
+running @code{install-mh} and notifying you of this fact with the
+message in a temporary buffer:
 
 @example
 I'm going to create the standard MH path for you.
 @end example
 
-Therefore, if you've never run MH before and you're using an old
-version of MH-E, you need to run @command{install-mh} from the shell
-before you continue the tour. If you don't, you'll be greeted with the
-error message: @samp{Can't find MH profile}.
+Therefore, if you've never run MH before and you're using an old version
+of mh-e, you need to run @code{install-mh} from the shell before you
+continue the tour.  If you don't, you'll be greeted with the error
+message: @samp{Can't find MH profile}.
 
 @cindex @file{.emacs}
 @cindex files, @file{.emacs}
 
-@vindex @code{mh-progs}
-@vindex @code{mh-lib}
-@vindex @code{mh-lib-progs}
-
 If, during the tour described in this chapter, you see a message like:
 @samp{Searching for program: no such file or directory,
-/usr/local/bin/mhpath}, it means that the MH programs and files are
-kept in a nonstandard directory. In this case, manually set the
-variable @code{mh-progs} @footnote{If your version of MH-E is less
-than 6.0, then you will have to set @code{mh-lib} and
-@code{mh-lib-progs} manually too.} per its description in @ref{Reading
-Mail} in @file{~/.emacs} and restart @command{emacs}. For example:
+/usr/local/bin/mhpath}, it means that the MH programs and files are kept
+in a nonstandard directory.  In this case, simply add the following to
+@file{~/.emacs} and restart @code{emacs}.
 
 @vindex @code{mh-progs}, example
-
+@vindex @code{mh-lib}, example
+
+@c XXX Real example for really naive user?
 @example
 @group
-(setq mh-progs "/usr/bin/mh/")
+(setq mh-progs "@var{/path/to/MH/binary/directory/}")
+(setq mh-lib "@var{/path/to/MH/library/directory/}")
 @end group
 @end example
 
-Please report this as a bug and indicate the directory that contains
-your MH programs.
-
 @cindex ~
 
-The @samp{~} notation used by @file{~/.emacs} above represents your
-home directory. This is used by the @command{bash} and @command{csh} shells.
-If your shell does not support this feature, you could use the
-environment variable @samp{$HOME} (such as @file{$HOME/.emacs}) or the
-absolute path (as in @file{/home/wohler/.emacs}) instead.
-
-At this point, you should see something like the screen in the figure
-in @ref{Reading Mail Tour}. We're now ready to move on.
-
-@node Sending Mail Tour, Reading Mail Tour, Getting Started, Tour Through MH-E
+The @samp{~} notation used by @file{~/.emacs} above represents your home
+directory.  This is used by the @code{bash} and @code{csh} shells.  If
+your shell does not support this feature, you could use the environment
+variable @samp{$HOME} (such as @file{$HOME/.emacs}) or the absolute path
+(as in @file{/home/wohler/.emacs}) instead.
+
+At this point, you should see something like the screen in the
+figure in @ref{Reading Mail Tour}.  We're now ready to move on.
+
+@node Sending Mail Tour, Reading Mail Tour, Getting Started, Tour Through mh-e
 @section Sending Mail
 
 @cindex sending mail
 @findex @code{mh-smail}
 
 Let's start our tour by sending ourselves a message which we can later
-read and process. Enter @kbd{M-x mh-smail} to invoke the MH-E program
-to send messages. You will be prompted in the minibuffer by
-@samp{To:}. Enter your login name. The next prompt is @samp{cc:}. Hit
-@key{RET} to indicate that no carbon copies are to be sent. At the
-@samp{Subject:} prompt, enter @kbd{Test} or anything else that comes
-to mind.
+read and process.  Enter @kbd{M-x mh-smail} to invoke the mh-e program
+to send messages.  You will be prompted in the minibuffer by @samp{To:}.
+Enter your login name.  The next prompt is @samp{cc:}.  Hit @key{RET} to
+indicate that no carbon copies are to be sent.  At the @samp{Subject:}
+prompt, enter @kbd{Test} or anything else that comes to mind.
 
 @cindex MH-Letter mode
 @cindex modes, MH-Letter
 
 Once you've specified the recipients and subject, your message appears
 in an Emacs buffer whose mode @footnote{A @dfn{mode} changes Emacs to
-make it easier to edit a particular type of text.} is MH-Letter. Enter
-some text in the body of the message, using normal Emacs commands. You
-should now have something like this: @footnote{If you're running Emacs
-under the X Window System, then you would also see a menubar. Under
-Emacs 21, you would also see a toolbar. I've left out the menubar and
-toolbar in all of the example screens.}
+make it easier to edit a particular type of text.} is MH-Letter.
+Enter some text in the body of the message, using normal Emacs commands.
+You should now have something like this: @footnote{If you're running Emacs
+under the X Window System, then you would also see a menubar.  I've left
+out the menubar in all of the example screens.}
 
 @example
 @group
 
 
 
---:--  *scratch*   (Lisp Interaction)--L1--All-------------------------
+-----Emacs: *scratch*         (Lisp Interaction)--All---------------------
 To: wohler
 cc:
 Subject: Test
   This is a test message to get the wheels churning...#
 
 
---:** @{draft@}   (MH-Letter)--L5--All-----------------------------------
+--**-@{draft@}      (MH-Letter)--All----------------------------------------
 
 @end cartouche
-@i{MH-E message composition window}
+@i{mh-e message composition window}
 @end group
 @end example
 
 @cindex modes, MH-Letter
 
 Note the line of dashes that separates the header and the body of the
-message. It is essential that these dashes (or a blank line) are
+message.  It is essential that these dashes (or a blank line) are
 present or the body of your message will be considered to be part of
 the header.
 
-There are several commands specific to MH-Letter mode, but at this
-time we'll only use @kbd{C-c C-c} to send your message. Type @kbd{C-c
-C-c} now. That's all there is to it!
-
-@node Reading Mail Tour, Processing Mail Tour, Sending Mail Tour, Tour Through MH-E
+There are several commands specific to MH-Letter mode, but at
+this time we'll only use @kbd{C-c C-c} to send your message.  Type
+@kbd{C-c C-c} now.  That's all there is to it!
+
+@node Reading Mail Tour, Processing Mail Tour, Sending Mail Tour, Tour Through mh-e
 @section Receiving Mail
 
 @cindex reading mail
 @findex @code{mh-rmail}
-@cindex @command{inc}
-@cindex MH commands, @command{inc}
-@cindex @command{scan}
-@cindex MH commands, @command{scan}
+@cindex @code{inc}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{inc}
+@cindex @code{scan}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{scan}
 @cindex MH-Folder mode
 @cindex modes, MH-Folder
 
 To read the mail you've just sent yourself, enter @kbd{M-x mh-rmail}.
-This incorporates the new mail and put the output from @command{inc}
-@footnote{See the section @uref{@value{MH-BOOK-HOME}/reapre.htm,
-Reading Mail: inc show next prev} in the MH book.} (called @dfn{scan
-lines} after the MH program @command{scan} @footnote{See the section
-@* @uref{@value{MH-BOOK-HOME}/faswsprs.htm, Find and Specify with scan
-pick Ranges Sequences} in the MH book.} which prints a one-line
-summary of each message) into a buffer called @samp{+inbox} whose
-major mode is MH-Folder.
-
-@sp 1
+This incorporates the new mail and put the output from @code{inc}
+(called @dfn{scan lines} after the MH program @code{scan} which prints a
+one-line summary of each message) into a buffer called @samp{+inbox}
+whose major mode is MH-Folder.
+
+@sp 2
+@need 1000
 @center @strong{NOTE}
 
 @quotation
 The @kbd{M-x mh-rmail} command will show you only new mail, not old
-mail. If you were to run this tour again, you would use @kbd{F r} to
-pull all your messages into MH-E.
+mail.  If you were to run this tour again, you would use @kbd{M-r} to
+pull all your messages into mh-e.
 @end quotation
 
-@sp 1
-
-You should see the scan line for your message, and perhaps others. Use
+You should see the scan line for your message, and perhaps others.  Use
 @kbd{n} or @kbd{p} to move the cursor to your test message and type
-@key{RET} to read your message. You should see something like:
+@key{RET} to read your message.  You should see something like:
 
 @example
 @group
 @cartouche
-   3 t08/24  root       received fax files on Wed Aug 24 11:00:13 PDT 1
-#  4+t08/24  To:wohler  Test<<This is a test message to get the wheels 
-
---:%%  @{+inbox@} 4 msgs (1-4)   (MH-Folder Show)--L4--Bot--------------
+   3  24Aug  root       received fax files on Wed Aug 24 11:00:13 PDT 1994
+#  4+ 24Aug  To:wohler  Test<<This is a test message to get the wheels chu
+
+--%%-@{+inbox@} 4 msgs (1-4)      (MH-Folder Show)--Bot---------------------
 To: wohler
 Subject: Test
 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 1994 13:01:13 -0700
 
 
 
---:--  @{show-+inbox@} 4   (MH-Show)--L1--All---------------------------
+-----@{show-+inbox@} 4      (MH-Show)--Bot----------------------------------
 
 @end cartouche
 @i{After incorporating new messages}
 @end group
 @end example
 
-If you typed a long message, you can view subsequent pages with
-@key{SPC} and previous pages with @key{DEL}.
-
-@node Processing Mail Tour, Leaving MH-E, Reading Mail Tour, Tour Through MH-E
+If you typed a long message, you can view subsequent pages with @key{SPC}
+and previous pages with @key{DEL}.
+
+@node Processing Mail Tour, Leaving mh-e, Reading Mail Tour, Tour Through mh-e
 @section Processing Mail
 
 @cindex processing mail
 
 The first thing we want to do is reply to the message that we sent
-ourselves. Ensure that the cursor is still on the same line as your
-test message and type @kbd{r}. You are prompted in the minibuffer with
-@samp{Reply to whom:}. Here MH-E is asking whether you'd like to reply
-to the original sender only, to the sender and primary recipients, or
-to the sender and all recipients. If you simply hit @key{RET}, you'll
-reply only to the sender. Hit @key{RET} now.
+ourselves.  Ensure that the cursor is still on the same line as your
+test message and type @kbd{r}.  You are prompted in the minibuffer with
+@samp{Reply to whom:}.  Here mh-e is asking whether you'd like to reply
+to the original sender only, to the sender and primary recipients, or to
+the sender and all recipients.  If you simply hit @key{RET}, you'll
+reply only to the sender.  Hit @key{RET} now.
 
 You'll find yourself in an Emacs buffer similar to that when you were
 sending the original message, like this:
 --------
 #
 
---:--  @{draft@}   (MH-Letter)--L11--Bot---------------------------------
+--**-@{draft@}      (MH-Letter)--All----------------------------------------
 To: wohler
 Subject: Test
 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 1994 13:01:13 -0700
 
   This is a test message to get the wheels churning...
 
---:--  @{show-+inbox@} 4   (MH-Show)--L1--All----------------------------
+-----@{show-+inbox@} 4      (MH-Show)--Bot----------------------------------
 Composing a reply...done
 @end cartouche
 @i{Composition window during reply}
 @end group
 @end example
 
-By default, MH will not add you to the address list of your replies,
-so if you find that the @samp{To:} header field is missing, don't
-worry. In this case, type @kbd{C-c C-f C-t} to create and go to the
-@samp{To:} field, where you can type your login name again. You can
-move around with the arrow keys or with @kbd{C-p}
-(@code{previous-line}), @kbd{C-n} (@code{next-line}), @kbd{C-b}
-(@code{backward-char}), and @kbd{C-f} (@code{forward-char}) and can
-delete the previous character with @key{BS}. When you're finished
-editing your message, send it with @kbd{C-c C-c} as before.
+By default, MH will not add you to the address list of your replies, so
+if you find that the @samp{To:} header field is missing, don't worry.
+In this case, type @kbd{C-c C-f C-t} to create and go to the @samp{To:}
+field, where you can type your login name again.  You can move around
+with the arrow keys or with @kbd{C-p} (@code{previous-line}), @kbd{C-n}
+(@code{next-line}), @kbd{C-b} (@code{backward-char}), and @kbd{C-f}
+(@code{forward-char}) and can delete the previous character with
+@key{BS}.  When you're finished editing your message, send it with
+@kbd{C-c C-c} as before.
 
 @cindex folder
 
-You'll often want to save messages that were sent to you in an
-organized fashion. This is done with @dfn{folders}. You can use
-folders to keep messages from your friends, or messages related to a
-particular topic. With your cursor in the MH-Folder buffer and
-positioned on the message you sent to yourself, type @kbd{o} to output
-(@command{refile} in MH parlance) that message to a folder. Enter
-@kbd{test} at the @samp{Destination:} prompt and type @kbd{y} (or
-@key{SPC}) when MH-E asks to create the folder @samp{+test}. Note that
-a @samp{^} (caret) appears next to the message number, which means
-that the message has been marked for refiling but has not yet been
-refiled. We'll talk about how the refile is actually carried out in a
-moment.
+You'll often want to save messages that were sent to you in an organized
+fashion.  This is done with @dfn{folders}.  You can use folders to keep
+messages from your friends, or messages related to a particular topic.
+With your cursor in the MH-Folder buffer and positioned on the message
+you sent to yourself, type @kbd{o} to output (@code{refile} in MH
+parlance) that message to a folder.  Enter @kbd{test} at the
+@samp{Destination:} prompt and type @kbd{y} (or @key{SPC}) when mh-e
+asks to create the folder @samp{+test}.  Note that a @samp{^} (caret)
+appears next to the message number, which means that the message has
+been marked for refiling but has not yet been refiled.  We'll talk about
+how the refile is actually carried out in a moment.
 
 @cindex MH-Folder mode
 @cindex modes, MH-Folder
 
-Your previous reply is now waiting in the system mailbox. You
+Your previous reply is now waiting in the system mailbox.  You
 incorporate this mail into your MH-Folder buffer named @samp{+inbox}
-with the @kbd{i} command. Do this now. After the mail is incorporated,
+with the @kbd{i} command.  Do this now.  After the mail is incorporated,
 use @kbd{n} or @kbd{p} to move the cursor to the new message, and read
-it with @key{RET}. Let's delete this message by typing @kbd{d}. Note
-that a @samp{D} appears next to the message number. This means that
-the message is marked for deletion but is not yet deleted. To perform
-the deletion (and the refile we did previously), use the @kbd{x}
-command.
+it with @key{RET}.  Let's delete this message by typing @kbd{d}.  Note
+that a @samp{D} appears next to the message number.  This means that the
+message is marked for deletion but is not yet deleted.  To perform the
+deletion (and the refile we did previously), use the @kbd{x} command.
 
 @findex @code{mh-smail}
 
 If you want to send another message you can use @kbd{m} instead of
-@kbd{M-x mh-smail}. So go ahead, send some mail to your friends!
-
-@node Leaving MH-E, More About MH-E, Processing Mail Tour, Tour Through MH-E
-@section Leaving MH-E
+@kbd{M-x mh-smail}.  So go ahead, send some mail to your friends!
+
+@node Leaving mh-e, More About mh-e, Processing Mail Tour, Tour Through mh-e
+@section Leaving mh-e
 
 @cindex Emacs, quitting
 @cindex quitting
 
-You may now wish to exit @command{emacs} entirely. Use @kbd{C-x C-c} to
-exit @command{emacs}. If you exited without running @kbd{x} in the
-@samp{+inbox} buffer, Emacs will offer to save it for you. Type
-@kbd{y} or @key{SPC} to save @samp{+inbox} changes, which means to
-perform any refiles and deletes that you did there.
+You may now wish to exit @code{emacs} entirely.  Use @kbd{C-x C-c} to
+exit @code{emacs}.  If you exited without running @kbd{x} in the
+@samp{+inbox} buffer, Emacs will offer to save it for you.  Type @kbd{y}
+or @key{SPC} to save @samp{+inbox} changes, which means to perform any refiles
+and deletes that you did there.
 
 If you don't want to leave Emacs, you can type @kbd{q} to bury (hide)
-the MH-E folder or delete it entirely with @kbd{C-x k}. You can then
-later recall it with @kbd{C-x b} or @kbd{M-x mh-rmail}.
-
-@node More About MH-E,  , Leaving MH-E, Tour Through MH-E
-@section More About MH-E
+the mh-e folder or delete them entirely with @kbd{C-x k}.  You can then
+later recall them with @kbd{C-x b} or @kbd{M-x mh-rmail}.
+
+@node More About mh-e,  , Leaving mh-e, Tour Through mh-e
+@section More About mh-e
 
 These are the basic commands to get you going, but there are plenty
-more. If you think that MH-E is for you, read @ref{Using MH-E} to find
-out how you can:
+more.  If you think that mh-e is for you, read @ref{Using mh-e} and
+@ref{Customizing mh-e} to find out how you can:
 
 @itemize @bullet
 @item
-Print your messages. (@ref{Printing}.)
+Print your messages.  (@ref{Printing} and @ref{Customizing Printing}.)
 @item
-Edit messages and include your signature. (@ref{Draft Editing}.)
+Edit messages and include your signature.  (@ref{Draft Editing}
+and @ref{Customizing Draft Editing}.)
 @item
-Forward messages. (@ref{Forwarding}.)
+Forward messages.  (@ref{Forwarding} and @ref{Customizing Forwarding}.)
 @item
-Read digests. (@ref{Viewing}.)
+Read digests.  (@ref{Viewing}.)
 @item
-Edit bounced messages. (@ref{Old Drafts}.)
+Edit bounced messages.  (@ref{Old Drafts} and @ref{Customizing Old Drafts}.)
 @item
-Send multimedia messages. (@ref{Editing MIME}.)
+Send multimedia messages.  (@ref{Editing MIME} and @ref{Customizing Editing MIME}.)
 @item
-Process mail that was sent with @command{shar} or @command{uuencode}.
+Process mail that was sent with @code{shar} or @code{uuencode}.
 (@ref{Files and Pipes}.)
 @item
-Use sequences conveniently. (@ref{Sequences}.)
+Use sequences conveniently.  (@ref{Sequences}.)
 @item
-Show header fields in different fonts. (@ref{Viewing}.)
+Show header fields in different fonts.  (@ref{Customizing Viewing}.)
 @item
-Find previously refiled messages. (@ref{Searching}.)
+Find previously refiled messages.  (@ref{Searching}.)
 @item
-Place messages in a file. (@ref{Files and Pipes}.)
+Place messages in a file.  (@ref{Files and Pipes}.)
 @end itemize
 
-Remember that you can also use MH commands when you're not running
-MH-E (and when you are!).
-
-@node Using MH-E, Odds and Ends, Tour Through MH-E, Top
-@chapter Using MH-E
-
-This chapter is the workhorse of the manual. It goes into more detail
-about every MH-E command. The default, or "out of the box," behavior
-is documented.
+Remember that you can also use MH commands when you're not running mh-e
+(and when you are!).
+
+@node    Using mh-e, Customizing mh-e, Tour Through mh-e, Top
+@chapter Using mh-e
+
+This chapter leaves the tutorial style and goes into more detail about
+every mh-e command.  The default, or "out of the box," behavior is
+documented.  If this is not to your liking (for instance, you print with
+something other than @code{lpr)}, see the associated section in
+@ref{Customizing mh-e} which is organized exactly like this chapter.
 
 @cindex Emacs, functions; describe-mode
 @cindex Emacs, online help
 @cindex online help
 
-There are many commands, but don't get intimidated. There are command
-summaries at the beginning of each section. In case you have or would
-like to rebind the keys, the command summaries also list the
-associated Emacs Lisp function. Furthermore, even if you're stranded
-on a desert island with a laptop and are without your manuals, you can
-get a summary of all these commands with GNU Emacs online help: use
-@kbd{C-h m} (@code{describe-mode}) for a brief summary of commands or
-@kbd{C-h i} to read this manual via Info. The online help is quite
-good; try running @kbd{C-h C-h C-h}. This brings up a list of
-available help topics, one of which displays the documentation for a
-given key (like @kbd{C-h k C-n}). Another useful help feature is to
-view the manual section that describes a given key (such as @kbd{C-h
-C-k i}). In addition, review @ref{Conventions}, if any of the GNU
-Emacs conventions are strange to you.
-
-In addition to all of the commands, it is also possible to reconfigure
-MH-E to fit the needs of even the most demanding user. The following
-sections also describe all of the options, show the defaults, and make
-recommendations for customization.
-
-However, when customizing your mail environment, first try to change
-what you want in MH, and only change MH-E if changing MH is not
-possible. That way you will get the same behavior inside and outside
-GNU Emacs. Note that MH-E does not provide hooks for customizations
-that can be done in MH; this omission is intentional.
-
-@cindex setting options
-@cindex Emacs, setting options
-@findex @code{customize-option}
-@vindex @code{mh-lpr-command-format}, example
-
-Many string or integer options are easy to modify using @kbd{M-x
-customize-option}. For example, to modify the option that controls
-printing, you would run @kbd{M-x customize-option RET
-mh-lpr-command-format RET}. In the buffer that appears, modify the
-string to the right of the variable. For example, you may change the
-@command{lpr} command with @samp{nenscript -G -r -2 -i'%s'}. Then use
-the @samp{State} combobox and select @samp{Save for Future Sessions}.
-@ref{Printing} talks more about this option.
-
-@vindex @code{mh-bury-show-buffer}, example
-
-Options can also hold boolean values. In Emacs Lisp, the boolean
-values are @code{nil}, which means false, and @code{t}, which means
-true. The @code{customize-option} function makes it easy to change
-boolean values; simply click on the toggle button in the customize
-buffer. For example, try setting @code{mh-bury-show-buffer} to
-@samp{off} or @code{nil} to keep the MH-Show buffer at the top of the
-buffer stack. Use the @samp{State} combobox and choose @samp{Set for
-Current Session} to see how the option affects the show buffer.
-Then choose the @samp{Erase Customization} menu item to reset the
-option to the default, which places the MH-Show buffer at the bottom
-of the buffer stack.
-
-The text usually says to turn on an option by setting it to a
-@emph{non-@code{nil}} value, because sometimes values other than
-@code{t} are meaningful (for example, see @code{mhl-formfile},
-described in @ref{Viewing}). Other options, such as hooks, involve a
-little more Emacs Lisp programming expertise.
-
-@cindex @samp{mh} customization group
-@cindex customization group, @samp{mh}
-@cindex @samp{mh-buffer} customization group
-@cindex customization group, @samp{mh-buffer}
-@cindex @samp{mh-compose} customization group
-@cindex customization group, @samp{mh-compose}
-@cindex @samp{mh-hook} customization group
-@cindex customization group, @samp{mh-hook}
-@findex @code{customize-group}
-
-You can browse all of the MH-E options with the @code{customize-group}
-function. Try entering @kbd{M-x customize-group RET mh RET}. The other
-MH-E groups include @samp{mh-buffer}, @samp{mh-compose} and
-@samp{mh-hook}. These groups are also accessible from the @samp{mh}
-group buffer.
-
-@need 1000
-
-While options can be set via Emacs customization, variables must be
-modified using Emacs Lisp. For example:
-
-@vindex @code{mh-progs}, example
-
-@lisp
-(setq mh-progs "/usr/local/bin/mh/")
-@end lisp
-
-@cindex @file{.emacs}
-@cindex files, @file{.emacs}
-
-Any such modifications should be placed in a file called @file{.emacs}
-in your home directory (that is, @file{~/.emacs}).
-
-You can ``preview'' the effects of changing variables before
-committing the changes to @file{~/.emacs}. Variables can be changed in
-the current Emacs session by using @kbd{M-x set-variable}.
-
-@cindex Emacs, Emacs Lisp manual
-@cindex Emacs, online help
-@cindex online help
-@cindex Emacs, info
-@cindex info
-
-I hope I've included enough examples here to get you well on your way.
-If you want to explore Emacs Lisp further, a programming manual does
-exist,
-@c Yes, some of the stuff in the following sections is redundant, but
-@c TeX barfs if the @ifs are inside the @footnote.
-@iftex
-@footnote{The @cite{GNU Emacs Lisp Reference Manual} may be available
-online in the Info system by typing @kbd{C-h i m Emacs Lisp RET}. If
-not, you can order a printed manual, which has the desirable
-side-effect of helping to support the Free Software Foundation which
-made all this great software available. You can find an order form by
-running @kbd{C-h C-d}, or you can request an order form from
-@i{gnu@@gnu.org}.}
-@end iftex
-@ifinfo
-@footnote{Perhaps you can find the online version of @ref{Top, The GNU
-Emacs Lisp Reference Manual, , elisp, GNU Emacs Lisp Reference
-Manual}. If not, you can order a printed manual, which has the
-desirable side-effect of helping to support the Free Software
-Foundation which made all this great software available. You can find
-an order form by running @kbd{C-h C-d}, or you can request an order
-form from @i{gnu@@gnu.org}.}
-@end ifinfo
-and you can look at the code itself for examples. Look in the Emacs
-Lisp directory on your system (such as
-@file{/usr/local/lib/emacs/lisp/mail}) and find all the @file{mh-*.el}
-files there. When calling MH-E and other Emacs Lisp functions directly
-from Emacs Lisp code, you'll need to know the correct arguments. Use
-the online help for this. For example, try @kbd{C-h f
-mh-execute-commands RET}. If you write your own functions, please do
-not prefix your symbols (variables and functions) with @samp{mh-}.
-This prefix is reserved for the MH-E package. To avoid conflicts with
-existing MH-E symbols, use a prefix like @samp{my-} or your initials.
+There are many commands, but don't get intimidated.  There are command
+summaries at the beginning of each section.  In case you have or would
+like to rebind the keys, the command summaries also list the associated
+Emacs Lisp function.  Furthermore, even if you're stranded on a desert
+island with a laptop and are without your manuals, you can get a summary
+of all these commands with GNU Emacs online help: use @kbd{C-h m}
+(@code{describe-mode}) for a brief summary of commands or @kbd{C-h i} to
+read this manual via Info.  The online help is quite good; try running
+@kbd{C-h C-h C-h}.  This brings up a list of available help topics, one
+of which displays the documentation for a given key (like @kbd{C-h k
+C-n}).  In addition, review @ref{Conventions}, if any of the GNU Emacs
+conventions are strange to you.
 
 Let's get started!
 
 * Miscellaneous::               
 @end menu
 
-@node Reading Mail, Sending Mail, Using MH-E, Using MH-E
+@node Reading Mail, Sending Mail, Using mh-e, Using mh-e
 @section Reading Your Mail
 
 @cindex reading mail
 @cindex MH-Folder mode
 @cindex modes, MH-Folder
 
-The MH-E entry point for reading mail is @kbd{M-x mh-rmail}. This
-command incorporates your mail and creates a buffer called
-@samp{+inbox} in MH-Folder mode. The @kbd{M-x mh-rmail} command shows
-you only new mail, not old mail. @footnote{If you want to see your old
-mail as well, use @kbd{F r} to pull all your messages into MH-E. Or,
-give a prefix argument to @code{mh-rmail} so it will prompt you for
-folder to visit like @kbd{F v} (for example, @kbd{C-u M-x mh-rmail
-@key{RET} bob @key{RET}}). Both @kbd{F r} and @kbd{F v} are described
-in @ref{Organizing}.} The @samp{+inbox} buffer contains @dfn{scan
-lines}, which are one-line summaries of each incorporated message. You
-can perform most MH commands on these messages via one- or two-letter
-commands discussed in this chapter. See @command{scan}(1) for a
-description of the contents of the scan lines, and see the Figure in
-@ref{Reading Mail Tour}, for an example.
+The mh-e entry point for reading mail is @kbd{M-x mh-rmail}.  This
+command incorporates your mail and creates a buffer called @samp{+inbox}
+in MH-Folder mode.  The @kbd{M-x mh-rmail} command shows you only new
+mail, not old mail. @footnote{If you want to see your old mail as well,
+use @kbd{M-r} to pull all your messages into mh-e.  Or, give a prefix
+argument to @code{mh-rmail} so it will prompt you for folder to visit
+like @kbd{M-f} (for example, @kbd{C-u M-x mh-rmail @key{RET} bob
+@key{RET}}).  Both @kbd{M-r} and @kbd{M-f} are described in
+@ref{Organizing}.}  The @samp{+inbox} buffer contains @dfn{scan lines},
+which are one-line summaries of each incorporated message.  You can
+perform most MH commands on these messages via one-letter commands
+discussed in this chapter.  See @code{scan}(1) for a description of the
+contents of the scan lines, and see the Figure in @ref{Reading Mail
+Tour}, for an example.
 
 @table @kbd
 @item RET
-@itemx .
 Display a message (@code{mh-show}).
 
 @item SPC
 @item , (comma)
 Display a message with all header fields (@code{mh-header-display}).
 
+@item M-SPC
+Go to next message in digest (@code{mh-page-digest}).
+
+@item M-BS
+Go to previous message in digest (@code{mh-page-digest-backwards}).
+
+@item M-b
+Break up digest into separate messages (@code{mh-burst-digest}).
+
 @item n
 Display next message (@code{mh-next-undeleted-msg}).
 
 Go to last message (@code{mh-last-msg}).
 
 @item t
-Toggle between MH-Folder and MH-Folder Show modes
-(@code{mh-toggle-showing}).
+Toggle between MH-Folder and MH-Folder Show modes (@code{mh-toggle-showing}).
 @end table
 
+@menu
+* Viewing::                     
+* Moving Around::               
+@end menu
+
+@node Viewing, Moving Around, Reading Mail, Reading Mail
+@subsection Viewing Your Mail
+
+@findex @code{mh-show}
+@findex @code{mh-page-msg}
+@findex @code{mh-previous-page}
+@findex @code{mh-header-display}
+
+The @kbd{RET} (@code{mh-show}) command displays the message that the
+cursor is on.  If the message is already displayed, it scrolls to the
+beginning of the message.  Use @key{SPC} (@code{mh-page-msg}) and
+@key{BS} (@code{mh-previous-page}) to move forwards and backwards one
+page at a time through the message.  You can give either of these
+commands a prefix argument that specifies the number of lines to scroll
+(such as @kbd{10 SPC}).  mh-e normally hides a lot of the
+superfluous header fields that mailers add to a message, but if you wish
+to see all of them, use the @kbd{,} (comma; @code{mh-header-display})
+command.
+
+@menu
+* Reading Digests::             
+* Reading MIME::                
+@end menu
+
+@node Reading Digests, Reading MIME, Viewing, Viewing
+@subsubsection Reading Digests
+
+@cindex digests
+@findex @code{mh-page-digest}
+@findex @code{mh-page-digest-backwards}
+
+A digest is a message that contains other messages.  Special mh-e
+commands let you read digests conveniently.  You can use @key{SPC} and
+@key{BS} to page through the digest as if it were a normal message, but
+if you wish to skip to the next message in the digest, use @kbd{M-SPC}
+(@code{mh-page-digest}).  To return to a previous message, use
+@kbd{M-BS} (@code{mh-page-digest-backwards}).
+
+@cindex @code{burst}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{burst}
+@cindex MH-Folder Show mode
+@cindex modes, MH-Folder Show
+@findex @code{mh-burst-digest}
+
+@c There was a page break at the colon in the following paragraph which
+@c broke the transition to the example.
+@need 2000
+
+Another handy command is @kbd{M-b} (@code{mh-burst-digest}).  This
+command uses the MH command @code{burst} to break out each message in
+the digest into its own message.  Using this command, you can quickly
+delete unwanted messages, like this: Once the digest is split up, toggle
+out of MH-Folder Show mode with @kbd{t} (@pxref{Moving Around}) so that
+the scan lines fill the screen and messages aren't displayed.  Then use
+@kbd{d} (@pxref{Deleting}) to quickly delete messages that you don't
+want to read (based on the @samp{Subject:} header field).  You can also
+burst the digest to reply directly to the people who posted the messages
+in the digest.  One problem you may encounter is that the @samp{From:}
+header fields are preceded with a @samp{>} so that your reply can't
+create the @samp{To:} field correctly.  In this case, you must correct
+the @samp{To:} field yourself.  This is described later in @ref{Editing
+Textual}.
+
+@node Reading MIME,  , Reading Digests, Viewing
+@subsubsection Reading Multimedia Mail
+
+@cindex multimedia mail
+@cindex MIME
+@cindex @code{show}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{show}
+@cindex @code{mhshow}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{mhshow}
+
+MH has the ability to read @dfn{@sc{mime}} (Multipurpose Internet Mail
+Extensions) messages.  Unfortunately, mh-e does not yet have this
+ability, so you have to use the MH commands @code{show} or @code{mhshow}
+from the shell to read @sc{mime} messages.  @footnote{You can call them
+directly from Emacs if you're running the X Window System: type @kbd{M-!
+xterm -e mhshow @var{message-number}}.  You can leave out the @code{xterm
+-e} if you use @code{mhlist} or @code{mhstore}.}
+
+@node Moving Around,  , Viewing, Reading Mail
+@subsection Moving Around
+
+@cindex moving between messages
+@findex @code{mh-next-undeleted-msg}
+@findex @code{mh-previous-undeleted-msg}
+@findex @code{mh-goto-msg}
+@findex @code{mh-last-msg}
+@findex @code{mh-first-msg}
+
+To move on to the next message, use the @kbd{n}
+(@code{mh-next-undeleted-msg}) command; use the @kbd{p}
+(@code{mh-previous-undeleted-msg}) command to read the previous message.
+Both of these commands can be given a prefix argument to specify how
+many messages to skip (for example, @kbd{5 n}).  You can also move to a
+specific message with @kbd{g} (@code{mh-goto-msg}).  You can enter the
+message number either before or after typing @kbd{g}.  In the latter
+case, Emacs prompts you.  Finally, you can go to the first or last
+message with @kbd{M-<} (@code{mh-first-msg}) and @kbd{M->}
+(@code{mh-last-msg}) respectively.
+
+@cindex MH-Folder mode
+@cindex modes, MH-Folder
+
+You can also use the Emacs commands @kbd{C-p} (@code{previous-line}) and
+@kbd{C-n} (@code{next-line}) to move up and down the scan lines in the
+MH-Folder window.  These commands can be used in conjunction with
+@kbd{RET} to look at deleted or refiled messages.
+
+@cindex MH-Folder mode
+@cindex modes, MH-Folder
+@cindex MH-Folder Show mode
+@cindex modes, MH-Folder Show
+@cindex junk mail
+@findex @code{mh-toggle-showing}
+
+The command @kbd{t} (@code{mh-toggle-showing}) switches between
+MH-Folder mode and MH-Folder Show mode.  @footnote{For you Emacs
+wizards, this is implemented as an Emacs minor mode.} MH-Folder mode
+turns off the associated show buffer so that you can perform operations
+on the messages quickly without reading them.  This is an excellent way
+to prune out your junk mail or to refile a group of messages to another
+folder for later examination.
+
+@node Sending Mail, Draft Editing, Reading Mail, Using mh-e
+@section Sending Mail
+
+@cindex sending mail
+@findex @code{mh-smail}
+
+You can send a mail message in several ways.  You can call @kbd{M-x
+mh-smail} directly, or from the command line like this:
+
+@cindex starting from command line
+
+@example
+% @kbd{emacs -f mh-smail}
+@end example
+
+From within mh-e's MH-Folder mode, other methods of sending mail
+are available as well:
+
 @table @kbd
-@item D SPC
-Go to next message in digest (@code{mh-page-digest}).
-
-@item D BS
-Go to previous message in digest (@code{mh-page-digest-backwards}).
-
-@item D b
-Break up digest into separate messages (@code{mh-burst-digest}).
-
+@item m
+Compose a message (@code{mh-send}).
+
+@item r
+Reply to a message (@code{mh-reply}).
+
+@item f
+Forward message(s) (@code{mh-forward}).
+
+@item M-d
+Redistribute a message (@code{mh-redistribute}).
+
+@item M-e
+Edit a message that was bounced by mailer (@code{mh-extract-rejected-mail}).
+
+@item M-a
+Edit a message to send it again (@code{mh-edit-again}).
 @end table
 
-The following table lists general options and variables. Variables,
-which must be set with the @code{setq} function are designated as
-such, in contrast to options which are set via the customize
-interface.
+@cindex MH-Folder mode
+@cindex modes, MH-Folder
+@cindex MH-Letter mode
+@cindex modes, MH-Letter
+@findex @code{mh-send}
+
+From within a MH-Folder buffer, you can simply use the command @kbd{m}
+(@code{mh-send}).  However you invoke @code{mh-send}, you are prompted
+for the @samp{To:}, @samp{cc:}, and @samp{Subject:} header fields.  Once
+you've specified the recipients and subject, your message appears in an
+Emacs buffer whose mode is MH-Letter (see the Figure in @ref{Sending
+Mail} to see what the buffer looks like).  MH-Letter mode allows you to
+edit your message, to check the validity of the recipients, to insert
+other messages into your message, and to send the message.  We'll go
+more into depth about editing a @dfn{draft} @footnote{I highly recommend
+that you use a @dfn{draft folder} so that you can edit several drafts in
+parallel.  To do so, create a folder (e.g., @file{+drafts}), and add a
+profile component called @samp{Draft-Folder:} which contains
+@file{+drafts} (see @code{mh-profile}(5)).} (a message you're composing)
+in just a moment.
+
+@findex @code{mh-smail}
+@findex @code{mh-smail-other-window}
+
+@code{mh-smail} always creates a two-window layout with the current
+buffer on top and the draft on the bottom.  If you would rather preserve
+the window layout, use @kbd{M-x mh-smail-other-window}.
+
+@menu
+* Replying::                    
+* Forwarding::                  
+* Redistributing::              
+* Old Drafts::                  
+@end menu
+
+@node Replying, Forwarding, Sending Mail, Sending Mail
+@subsection Replying to Mail
+
+@cindex replying
+@cindex @code{mhl}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{mhl}
+@cindex @file{mhl.reply}
+@cindex files, @file{mhl.reply}
+@findex @code{mh-reply}
+
+To compose a reply to a message, use the @kbd{r} (@code{mh-reply})
+command.  If you supply a prefix argument (as in @kbd{C-u r}), the
+message you are replying to is inserted in your reply after having first
+been run through @code{mhl} with the format file @file{mhl.reply}.  See
+@code{mhl}(1) to see how you can modify the default @file{mhl.reply}
+file.
+
+When you reply to a message, you are first prompted with @samp{Reply to
+whom?}.  You have several choices here.
+
+@example
+@group
+@b{Response}     @b{Reply Goes To}
+
+@kbd{from}         @r{The person who sent the message.  This is the default,}
+             @r{so @key{RET} is sufficient.}
+
+@kbd{to}           @r{Replies to the sender, plus all recipients in the}
+             @r{@samp{To:} header field.}
+
+@kbd{all}
+@kbd{cc}           @r{Forms a reply to the sender, plus all recipients.}
+@end group
+@end example
+
+@cindex @code{repl}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{repl}
+
+Depending on your answer, @code{repl} is given a different argument to
+form your reply.  Specifically, a choice of @kbd{from} or none at all
+runs @code{repl -nocc all}, and a choice of @kbd{to} runs @code{repl -cc
+to}.  Finally, either @kbd{cc} or @kbd{all} runs @code{repl -cc all
+-nocc me}.
+
+@cindex MH-Letter mode
+@cindex modes, MH-Letter
+
+Two windows are then created.  One window contains the message to which
+you are replying.  Your draft, in MH-Letter mode (described in
+@ref{Draft Editing}), is in the other window.
+
+If you wish to customize the header or other parts of the reply draft,
+please see @code{repl}(1) and @code{mh-format}(5).
+
+@node Forwarding, Redistributing, Replying, Sending Mail
+@subsection Forwarding Mail
+
+@cindex forwarding
+@cindex @code{forw}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{forw}
+@findex @code{mh-forward}
+
+To forward a message, use the @kbd{f} (@code{mh-forward}) command.  You
+are given a draft to edit that looks like it would if you had run the MH
+command @code{forw}.  You are given a chance to add some text (see
+@ref{Draft Editing}).
+
+You can forward several messages by using a prefix argument; in this
+case, you are prompted for the name of a @dfn{sequence}, a symbolic name
+that represents a list or range of message numbers (for example,
+@kbd{C-u f forbob @key{RET}}).  All of the messages in the sequence are
+inserted into your draft.  By the way, although sequences are often
+mentioned in this chapter, you don't have to worry about them for now;
+the full description of sequences in mh-e is at the end in
+@ref{Sequences}.  To learn more about sequences in general, please see
+@code{mh-sequence}(5).
+
+@node Redistributing, Old Drafts, Forwarding, Sending Mail
+@subsection Redistributing Your Mail
+
+@cindex redistributing
+@findex @code{mh-redistribute}
+
+The command @kbd{M-d} (@code{mh-redistribute}) is similar in function to
+forwarding mail, but it does not allow you to edit the message, nor does
+it add your name to the @samp{From:} header field.  It appears to the
+recipient as if the message had come from the original sender.  For more
+information on redistributing messages, see @code{dist}(1).  Also
+investigate the @kbd{M-a} (@code{mh-edit-again}) command in @ref{Old
+Drafts}, for another way to redistribute messages.
+
+@node Old Drafts,  , Redistributing, Sending Mail
+@subsection Editing Old Drafts and Bounced Messages
+
+@cindex re-editing drafts
+@cindex @file{draft}
+@cindex files, @file{draft}
+@findex @code{mh-edit-again}
+
+If you don't complete a draft for one reason or another, and if the
+draft buffer is no longer available, you can pick your draft up again
+with @kbd{M-a} (@code{mh-edit-again}).  If you don't use a draft folder,
+your last @file{draft} file will be used.  If you use draft folders,
+you'll need to visit the draft folder with @kbd{M-f drafts @key{RET}},
+use @kbd{n} to move to the appropriate message, and then use @kbd{M-a}
+to prepare the message for editing.
+
+The @kbd{M-a} command can also be used to take messages that were sent
+to you and to send them to more people.
+
+@cindex Mailer-Daemon
+@findex @code{mh-extract-rejected-mail}
+
+Don't use @kbd{M-a} to re-edit a message from a @i{Mailer-Daemon} who
+complained that your mail wasn't posted for some reason or another.  In
+this case, use @kbd{M-e} (@code{mh-extract-rejected-mail}) to prepare
+the message for editing by removing the @i{Mailer-Daemon} envelope and
+unneeded header fields.  Fix whatever addressing problem you had, and
+send the message again with @kbd{C-c C-c}.
+
+@node Draft Editing, Moving Mail, Sending Mail, Using mh-e
+@section Editing a Draft
+
+@cindex editing draft
+@cindex MH-Letter mode
+@cindex modes, MH-Letter
+
+When you edit a message that you want to send (called a @dfn{draft} in
+this case), the mode used is MH-Letter.  This mode provides
+several commands in addition to the normal Emacs editing commands to
+help you edit your draft.
+
+@table @kbd
+@item C-c C-y
+Insert contents of message to which you're replying (@code{mh-yank-cur-msg}).
+
+@item C-c C-i
+Insert a message from a folder (@code{mh-insert-letter}).
+
+@item C-c C-f C-t
+Move to @samp{To:} header field (@code{mh-to-field}).
+
+@item C-c C-f C-c
+Move to @samp{cc:} header field (@code{mh-to-field}).
+
+@item C-c C-f C-s
+Move to @samp{Subject:} header field (@code{mh-to-field}).
+
+@item C-c C-f C-f
+Move to @samp{From:} header field (@code{mh-to-field}).
+
+@item C-c C-f C-b
+Move to @samp{Bcc:} header field (@code{mh-to-field}).
+
+@item C-c C-f C-f
+Move to @samp{Fcc:} header field (@code{mh-to-fcc}).
+
+@item C-c C-f C-d
+Move to @samp{Dcc:} header field (@code{mh-to-field}).
+
+@item C-c C-w
+Display expanded recipient list (@code{mh-check-whom}).
+
+@item C-c C-s
+Insert signature in message (@code{mh-insert-signature}).
+
+@item C-c C-m C-f
+Include forwarded message (@sc{mime}) (@code{mh-mhn-compose-forw}).
+
+@item C-c C-m C-e
+Include anonymous ftp reference (@sc{mime}) (@code{mh-mhn-compose-anon-ftp}).
+
+@item C-c C-m C-t
+Include anonymous ftp reference to compressed tar file (@sc{mime})
+(@code{mh-mhn-compose-external-compressed-tar}).
+
+@item C-c C-m C-i
+Include binary, image, sound, etc. (@sc{mime})
+(@code{mh-mhn-compose-insertion}).
+
+@item C-c C-e
+Run through @code{mhn} before sending (@code{mh-edit-mhn}).
+
+@item C-c C-m C-u
+Undo effects of @code{mhn} (@code{mh-revert-mhn-edit}).
+
+@item C-c C-c
+Save draft and send message (@code{mh-send-letter}).
+
+@item C-c C-q
+Quit editing and delete draft message (@code{mh-fully-kill-draft}).
+@end table
+
+@menu
+* Editing Textual::             
+* Editing MIME::                
+* Sending Message::             
+* Killing Draft::               
+@end menu
+
+@node Editing Textual, Editing MIME, Draft Editing, Draft Editing
+@subsection Editing Textual Messages
+
+The following sections show you how to edit a draft.
+The commands described here are also applicable to messages that have
+multimedia components.
+
+@menu
+* Inserting Letter::            
+* Inserting Messages::          
+* Header::                      
+* Recipients::                  
+* Signature::                   
+@end menu
+
+@node Inserting Letter, Inserting Messages, Editing Textual, Editing Textual
+@subsubsection Inserting letter to which you're replying
+
+@cindex inserting messages
+@findex @code{mh-yank-cur-msg}
+
+It is often useful to insert a snippet of text from a letter that
+someone mailed to provide some context for your reply.  The command
+@kbd{C-c C-y} (@code{mh-yank-cur-msg}) does this by yanking a portion of
+text from the message to which you're replying and inserting @samp{> }
+before each line.
+
+@cindex mark
+@cindex Emacs, mark
+@cindex point
+@cindex Emacs, point
+@cindex region
+@cindex Emacs, region
+
+You can control how much text is included when you run this command.  If
+you run this command right away, without entering the buffer containing
+the message to you, this command will yank the entire message, as is,
+into your reply. @footnote{If you'd rather have the header cleaned up,
+use @kbd{C-u r} instead of @kbd{r} when replying (see @ref{Replying}).}
+If you enter the buffer containing the message sent to you and move the
+cursor to a certain point and return to your reply and run @kbd{C-c
+C-y}, then the text yanked will range from that point to the end of the
+message.  Finally, the most common action you'll perform is to enter the
+message sent to you, move the cursor to the beginning of a paragraph or
+phrase, set the @dfn{mark} with @kbd{C-SPC} or @kbd{C-@@}, and move the
+cursor to the end of the paragraph or phrase.  The cursor position is
+called the @dfn{point}, and the space between the mark and point is
+called the @dfn{region}.  Having done that, @kbd{C-c C-y} will insert
+the region you selected.
+
+@node Inserting Messages, Header, Inserting Letter, Editing Textual
+@subsubsection Inserting messages
+
+@cindex inserting messages
+@findex @code{mh-insert-letter}
+
+Messages can be inserted with @kbd{C-c C-i} (@code{mh-insert-letter}).
+This command prompts you for the folder and message number and inserts
+the message, indented by @samp{> }.  Certain undesirable header fields
+are removed before insertion.  If given a prefix argument (like @kbd{C-u
+C-c C-i}), the header is left intact, the message is not indented, and
+@samp{> } is not inserted before each line.
+
+@node Header, Recipients, Inserting Messages, Editing Textual
+@subsubsection Editing the header
+
+@cindex editing header
+@findex @code{mh-to-field}
+
+Because the header is part of the message, you can edit the header
+fields as you wish.  However, several convenience functions exist to
+help you create and edit them.  For example, the command @kbd{C-c C-f
+C-t} (@code{mh-to-field}; alternatively, @kbd{C-c C-f t}) moves the
+cursor to the @samp{To:} header field, creating it if necessary.  The
+functions to move to the @samp{cc:}, @samp{Subject:}, @samp{From:},
+@samp{Bcc:}, and @samp{Dcc:} header fields are similar.
+
+@findex @code{mh-to-fcc}
+
+One function behaves differently from the others, namely, @kbd{C-c C-f
+C-f} (@code{mh-to-fcc}; alternatively, @kbd{C-c C-f f}).  This function
+will prompt you for the folder name in which to file a copy of the draft.
+
+Be sure to leave a row of dashes or a blank line between the header and
+the body of the message.
+
+@node Recipients, Signature, Header, Editing Textual
+@subsubsection Checking recipients
+
+@cindex checking recipients
+@cindex @code{whom}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{whom}
+@findex @code{mh-check-whom}
+
+The @kbd{C-c C-w} (@code{mh-check-whom}) command expands aliases so you
+can check the actual address(es) in the alias.  A new buffer is created
+with the output of @code{whom}.
+
+@node Signature,  , Recipients, Editing Textual
+@subsubsection Inserting your signature
+
+@cindex inserting signature
+@cindex signature
+@cindex @file{.signature}
+@cindex files, @file{.signature}
+@findex @code{mh-insert-signature}
+
+You can insert your signature at the current cursor location with the
+@kbd{C-c C-s} (@code{mh-insert-signature}) command.  The text of your
+signature is taken from the file @file{~/.signature}.
+
+@node Editing MIME, Sending Message, Editing Textual, Draft Editing
+@subsection Editing Multimedia Messages
+
+@cindex MIME
+@cindex multimedia mail
+@cindex @code{mhn}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{mhn}
+
+mh-e has the capability to create multimedia messages.  It uses the
+@sc{mime} (Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions) protocol.  The
+@sc{mime} protocol allows you to incorporate images, sound, video,
+binary files, and even commands that fetch a file with @samp{ftp} when
+your recipient reads the message!  If you were to create a multimedia
+message with plain MH commands, you would use @code{mhn}.  Indeed, the
+mh-e @sc{mime} commands merely insert @code{mhn} directives which are
+later expanded by @code{mhn}.
+
+Each of the mh-e commands for editing multimedia messages or for
+incorporating multimedia objects is prefixed with @kbd{C-c C-m} .
+
+@cindex content types
+@cindex MIME, content types
+
+Several @sc{mime} objects are defined.  They are called @dfn{content
+types}.  The table in @ref{Customizing Draft Editing} contains a list of
+the content types that mh-e currently knows about.  Several of the mh-e
+commands fill in the content type for you, whereas others require you to
+enter one.  Most of the time, it should be obvious which one to use
+(e.g., use @kbd{image/jpeg} to include a @sc{jpeg} image).  If not, you
+can refer to @sc{rfc} 1521, 
+@c Footnotes are very fragile.  Hence the duplication.
+@c The line break in the footnote was necessary since TeX wasn't creating one.
+@ifclear html
+@footnote{This @sc{rfc} (Request For Comments) is
+available via the @sc{url} @*
+@file{ftp://ds.internic.net/rfc/rfc1521.txt}.}
+@end ifclear
+@ifset html
+@footnote{This @sc{rfc} (Request For Comments) is
+available via the @sc{url} @*
+@file{<A HREF="ftp://ds.internic.net/rfc/rfc1521.txt">ftp://ds.internic.net/rfc/rfc1521.txt</A>}.}
+@end ifset
+which defines the @sc{mime} protocol, for a list of valid content types.
+
+@cindex content description
+@cindex MIME, content description
+
+You are also sometimes asked for a @dfn{content description}.  This is
+simply an optional brief phrase, in your own words, that describes the
+object.  If you don't care to enter a content description, just press
+return and none will be included; however, a reader may skip over
+multimedia fields unless the content description is compelling.
+
+Remember: you can always add @code{mhn} directives by hand.
+
+@menu
+* Forwarding MIME::             
+* FTP::                         
+* Tar::                         
+* Other MIME Objects::          
+* Sending MIME::                
+@end menu
+
+@node Forwarding MIME, FTP, Editing MIME, Editing MIME
+@subsubsection Forwarding multimedia messages
+
+@findex @code{mh-mhn-compose-forw}
+
+Mail may be forwarded with @sc{mime} using the command @kbd{C-c C-m C-f}
+(@code{mh-mhn-compose-forw}).  You are prompted for a content
+description, the name of the folder in which the messages to forward are
+located, and the messages' numbers.
+
+@node FTP, Tar, Forwarding MIME, Editing MIME
+@subsubsection Including an ftp reference
+
+@cindex @code{ftp}
+@cindex Unix commands, @code{ftp}
+@cindex MIME, @code{ftp}
+@findex @code{mh-mhn-compose-anon-ftp}
+
+You can even have your message initiate an @code{ftp} transfer when the
+recipient reads the message.  To do this, use the @kbd{C-c C-m C-e}
+(@code{mh-mhn-compose-anon-ftp}) command.  You are prompted for the
+remote host and pathname, the content type, and the content description.
+
+@node Tar, Other MIME Objects, FTP, Editing MIME
+@subsubsection Including tar files
+
+@cindex @code{tar}
+@cindex Unix commands, @code{tar}
+@cindex MIME, @code{tar}
+@cindex @code{ftp}
+@cindex Unix commands, @code{ftp}
+@cindex MIME, @code{ftp}
+@findex @code{mh-mhn-compose-external-compressed-tar}
+
+If the remote file (@pxref{FTP}) is a compressed tar file, you can use
+@kbd{C-c C-m C-t} (@code{mh-mhn-compose-external-compressed-tar}).
+Then, in addition to retrieving the file via anonymous @emph{ftp}, the
+file will also be uncompressed and untarred.  You are prompted for the
+remote host and pathname and the content description.  The pathname
+should contain at least one @samp{/} (slash), because the pathname is
+broken up into directory and name components.
+
+@node Other MIME Objects, Sending MIME, Tar, Editing MIME
+@subsubsection Including other multimedia objects
+
+@cindex images
+@cindex MIME, images
+@cindex sound
+@cindex MIME, sound
+@cindex video
+@cindex MIME, video
+@findex @code{mh-mhn-compose-insertion}
+
+Images, sound, and video can be inserted in your message with the
+@kbd{C-c C-m C-i} (@code{mh-mhn-compose-insertion}) command.  You are
+prompted for the filename containing the object, the content type, and a
+content description of the object.
+
+@node Sending MIME,  , Other MIME Objects, Editing MIME
+@subsubsection Readying multimedia messages for sending
+
+When you are finished editing a @sc{mime} message, it might look like this:
+
+@example
+@group
+@cartouche
+   3  24Aug  root               received fax files on Wed Aug 24 11:00:13
+   4+ 24Aug  To:wohler          Test<<This is a test message to get the wh
+
+
+
+
+
+--%%-@{+inbox@} 4 msgs (1-4)      (MH-Folder Show)--Bot-------------------
+To: wohler
+cc:
+Subject: Test of MIME
+--------
+#@@application/octet-stream [Nonexistent ftp test file] \
+access-type=anon-ftp; site=berzerk.com; name=panacea.tar.gz; \
+directory="/pub/"
+#audio/basic [Test sound bite] /tmp/noise.au
+--**-@{draft@}      (MH-Letter)--All--------------------------------------
+
+@end cartouche
+@i{mh-e @sc{mime} draft}
+@end group
+@end example
+
+@cindex @code{mhn}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{mhn}
+@findex @code{mh-edit-mhn}
+
+The lines added by the previous commands are @code{mhn} directives and
+need to be converted to @sc{mime} directives before sending.  This is
+accomplished by the command @kbd{C-c C-e} (@code{mh-edit-mhn}), which
+runs @code{mhn} on the message.  The following screen shows what those
+commands look like in full @sc{mime} format.  You can see why mail user
+agents are usually built to hide these details from the user.
+
+@example
+@group
+@cartouche
+To: wohler
+cc:
+Subject: Test of MIME
+MIME-Version: 1.0
+Content-Type: multipart/mixed; boundary="----- =_aaaaaaaaaa0"
+Content-ID: <1623.777796162.0@@newt.com>
+
+------- =_aaaaaaaaaa0
+Content-Type: message/external-body; access-type="anon-ftp";
+        site="berzerk.com"; name="panacea.tar.gz"; directory="/pub/"
+
+Content-Type: application/octet-stream
+Content-ID: <1623.777796162.1@@newt.com>
+Content-Description: Nonexistent ftp test file
+
+------- =_aaaaaaaaaa0
+Content-Type: audio/basic
+Content-ID: <1623.777796162.2@@newt.com>
+Content-Description: Test sound bite
+Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64
+
+Q3JlYXRpdmUgVm9pY2UgRmlsZRoaAAoBKREBQh8AgwCAgH9/f35+fn59fX5+fn5+f39/f39/f3
+f4B/f39/f39/f39/f39/f39+f39+f39/f39/f4B/f39/fn5/f39/f3+Af39/f39/gH9/f39/fn
+-----@{draft@}      (MH-Letter)--Top--------------------------------------
+
+@end cartouche
+@i{mh-e @sc{mime} draft ready to send}
+@end group
+@end example
+
+@findex @code{mh-revert-mhn-edit}
+
+This action can be undone by running @kbd{C-c C-m C-u}
+(@code{mh-revert-mhn-edit}).  It does this by reverting to a backup
+file.  You are prompted to confirm this action, but you can avoid the
+confirmation by adding an argument (for example, @kbd{C-u C-c C-m C-u}).
+
+@node Sending Message, Killing Draft, Editing MIME, Draft Editing
+@subsection Sending a Message
+
+@cindex sending mail
+@findex @code{mh-send-letter}
+
+When you are all through editing a message, you send it with the
+@kbd{C-c C-c} (@code{mh-send-letter}) command.  You can give an argument
+(as in @kbd{C-u C-c C-c}) to monitor the first stage of the delivery.
+
+@node Killing Draft,  , Sending Message, Draft Editing
+@subsection Killing the Draft
+
+@cindex killing draft
+@findex @code{mh-fully-kill-draft}
+
+If for some reason you are not happy with the draft, you can kill it
+instead with @kbd{C-c C-q} (@code{mh-fully-kill-draft}).  Emacs then
+kills the draft buffer and deletes the draft message.
+
+@node Moving Mail, Searching, Draft Editing, Using mh-e
+@section Moving Your Mail Around
+
+@cindex processing mail
+
+This section covers how messages and folders can be moved about or
+manipulated.  Messages may be incorporated into your @file{+inbox},
+deleted, and refiled.  Messages containing @code{shar} or
+@code{uuencode} output can be stored.  Folders can be visited, sorted,
+packed, or deleted.  Here's a list of the available commands to do these
+things:
+
+@c Stephen thinks that ? should be documented here, since it also shows
+@c which folders a message will be refiled to. XXX
+
+@table @kbd
+@item i
+Incorporate new mail into folder (@code{mh-inc-folder}).
+
+@item d
+Delete message (@code{mh-delete-msg}).
+
+@item C-d
+Delete message, don't move to next message (@code{mh-delete-msg-no-motion}).
+
+@item M-s
+Find messages that meet search criteria (@code{mh-search-folder}).
+
+@item o
+Output (refile) message to folder (@code{mh-refile-msg}).
+
+@item c
+Copy message to folder (@code{mh-copy-msg}).
+
+@item C-o
+Output (write) message to file (@code{mh-write-msg-to-file}).
+
+@item !
+Repeat last output command (@code{mh-refile-or-write-again}).
+
+@item l
+Print message with @code{lpr} (@code{mh-print-msg}).
+
+@item |
+Pipe message through shell command (@code{mh-pipe-msg}).
+
+@item M-n
+Unpack message created with @code{uudecode} or @code{shar}
+(@code{mh-store-msg}).
+
+@item M-l
+List all folders (@code{mh-list-folders}).
+
+@item M-f
+Visit folder (@code{mh-visit-folder}).
+
+@item M-r
+Regenerate scan lines (@code{mh-rescan-folder}).
+
+@item M-x mh-sort-folder
+Sort folder.
+
+@item M-p
+Pack folder (@code{mh-pack-folder}).
+
+@item M-k
+Remove folder (@code{mh-kill-folder}).
+
+@item x
+Execute pending refiles and deletes (@code{mh-execute-commands}).
+
+@item u
+Undo pending refile or delete (@code{mh-undo}).
+
+@item M-u
+Undo all pending refiles and deletes (@code{mh-undo-folder}).
+
+@item q
+Quit (@code{mh-quit}).
+@end table
+
+@menu
+* Incorporating::               
+* Deleting::                    
+* Organizing::                  
+* Printing::                    
+* Files and Pipes::             
+* Finishing Up::                
+@end menu
+
+@node Incorporating, Deleting, Moving Mail, Moving Mail
+@subsection Incorporating Your Mail
+
+@cindex incorporating
+@findex @code{mh-inc-folder}
+
+If at any time you receive new mail, incorporate the new mail into your
+@samp{+inbox} buffer with @kbd{i} (@code{mh-inc-folder}).  Note that
+@kbd{i} will display the @samp{+inbox} buffer, even if there isn't any
+new mail.  You can incorporate mail from any file into the current
+folder by specifying a prefix argument; you'll be prompted for the name
+of the file to use (for example, @kbd{C-u i ~/mbox @key{RET}}).
+
+@cindex Emacs, notification of new mail
+@cindex notification of new mail
+@cindex new mail
+@cindex @file{.emacs}
+@cindex files, @file{.emacs}
+
+Emacs can notify you when you have new mail by displaying @samp{Mail} in
+the mode line.  To enable this behavior, and to have a clock in the mode
+line besides, add the following to @file{~/.emacs}:
+
+@findex @code{display-time}
+
+@lisp
+(display-time)
+@end lisp
+
+@node Deleting, Organizing, Incorporating, Moving Mail
+@subsection Deleting Your Mail
+
+@cindex deleting
+@findex @code{mh-delete-msg}
+@findex @code{mh-delete-msg-no-motion}
+
+To mark a message for deletion, use the @kbd{d} (@code{mh-delete-msg})
+command.  A @samp{D} is placed by the message in the scan window, and
+the next message is displayed.  If the previous command had been
+@kbd{p}, then the next message displayed is the message previous to the
+message just deleted.  If you specify a prefix argument, you will be
+prompted for a sequence (@pxref{Sequences}) to delete (for example,
+@kbd{C-u d frombob RET}).  The @kbd{x} command actually carries out the
+deletion (@pxref{Finishing Up}).  @kbd{C-d}
+(@code{mh-delete-msg-no-motion}) marks the message for deletion but
+leaves the cursor at the current message in case you wish to perform
+other operations on the message.
+
+@node Organizing, Printing, Deleting, Moving Mail
+@subsection Organizing Your Mail with Folders
+
+@cindex using folders
+@cindex @code{folder}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{folder}
+@cindex @code{refile}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{refile}
+@findex @code{mh-refile-msg}
+
+mh-e has analogies for each of the MH @code{folder} and @code{refile}
+commands.  To refile a message in another folder, use the @kbd{o}
+(@code{mh-refile-msg}) (mnemonic: ``output'') command.  You are prompted
+for the folder name.
+
+@findex @code{mh-refile-or-write-again}
+
+If you are refiling several messages into the same folder, you can use
+the @kbd{!} (@code{mh-refile-or-write-again}) command to repeat the last
+refile or write (see the description of @kbd{C-o} in @ref{Files and
+Pipes}).  Or, place the messages into a sequence (@ref{Sequences}) and
+specify a prefix argument to @kbd{o}, in which case you'll be prompted
+for the name of the sequence (for example, @kbd{C-u o search RET}).
+
+@findex @code{mh-copy-msg}
+
+If you wish to copy a message to another folder, you can use the @kbd{c}
+(@code{mh-copy-msg}) command (see the @code{-link} argument to
+@code{refile}(1)).  You are prompted for a folder, and you can specify a
+prefix argument if you want to copy a sequence into another folder.  In
+this case, you are then prompted for the sequence.  Note that unlike the
+@kbd{o} command, the copy takes place immediately.  The original copy
+remains in the current folder.
+
+@findex @code{mh-visit-folder}
+
+When you want to read the messages that you have refiled into folders,
+use the @kbd{M-f} (@code{mh-visit-folder}) command to visit the folder.
+You are prompted for the folder name.
+
+@findex @code{mh-list-folders}
+@findex @code{mh-kill-folder}
+@findex @code{mh-visit-folder}
+@findex @code{mh-sort-folder}
+@findex @code{mh-pack-folder}
+@findex @code{mh-rescan-folder}
+
+Other commands you can perform on folders include: @kbd{M-l}
+(@code{mh-list-folders}), to list all the folders in your mail
+directory; @kbd{M-k} (@code{mh-kill-folder}), to remove a folder;
+@kbd{M-x mh-sort-folder}, to sort the messages by date (see
+@code{sortm}(1) to see how to sort by other criteria); @kbd{M-p}
+(@code{mh-pack-folder}), to pack a folder, removing gaps from the
+numbering sequence; and @kbd{M-r} (@code{mh-rescan-folder}), to rescan
+the folder, which is useful to grab all messages in your @file{+inbox}
+after processing your new mail for the first time.  If you don't want to
+rescan the entire folder, give @kbd{M-r} or @kbd{M-p} a prefix argument
+and you'll be prompted for a range of messages to display (for instance,
+@kbd{C-u M-r last:50 RET}).
+
+@node Printing, Files and Pipes, Organizing, Moving Mail
+@subsection Printing Your Mail
+
+@cindex printing
+@cindex @code{mhl}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{mhl}
+@cindex @code{lpr}
+@cindex Unix commands, @code{lpr}
+@findex @code{mh-print-msg}
+
+Printing mail is simple.  Enter @kbd{l} (@code{mh-print-msg}) (for
+@i{l}ine printer or @i{l}pr).  The message is formatted with @code{mhl}
+and printed with the @code{lpr} command.  You can print all the messages
+in a sequence by specifying a prefix argument, in which case you are
+prompted for the name of the sequence (as in @kbd{C-u l frombob RET}).
+
+@node Files and Pipes, Finishing Up, Printing, Moving Mail
+@subsection Files and Pipes
+
+@cindex using files
+@cindex using pipes
+@findex @code{mh-write-msg-to-file}
+
+mh-e does offer a couple of commands that are not a part of MH@.  The
+first one, @kbd{C-o} (@code{mh-write-msg-to-file}), writes a message to
+a file (think of the @kbd{o} as in "output").  You are prompted for the
+filename.  If the file already exists, the message is appended to it.
+You can also write the message to the file without the header by
+specifying a prefix argument (such as @kbd{C-u C-o /tmp/foobar RET}).
+Subsequent writes to the same file can be made with the @kbd{!}
+command.
+
+@findex @code{mh-pipe-msg}
+
+You can also pipe the message through a Unix shell command with the
+@kbd{|} (@code{mh-pipe-msg}) command.  You are prompted for the
+Unix command through which you wish to run your message.  If you
+give an argument to this command, the message header is included in the
+text passed to the command (the contrived example @kbd{C-u | lpr}
+would be done with the @kbd{l} command instead).
+
+@cindex @code{shar}
+@cindex Unix commands, @code{shar}
+@cindex @code{uuencode}
+@cindex Unix commands, @code{uuencode}
+@findex @code{mh-store-msg}
+
+If the message is a shell archive @code{shar} or has been run through
+@code{uuencode} use @kbd{M-n} (@code{mh-store-msg}) to extract the body
+of the message.  The default directory for extraction is the current
+directory, and you have a chance to specify a different extraction
+directory.  The next time you use this command, the default directory is
+the last directory you used.
+
+@node Finishing Up,  , Files and Pipes, Moving Mail
+@subsection Finishing Up
+
+@cindex expunging refiles and deletes
+@findex @code{mh-undo}
+@findex @code{mh-undo-folder}
+
+If you've deleted a message or refiled it, but changed your mind, you
+can cancel the action before you've executed it.  Use @kbd{u}
+(@code{mh-undo}) to undo a refile on or deletion of a single message.
+You can also undo refiles and deletes for messages that belong to a
+given sequence by specifying a prefix argument.  You'll be prompted for
+the name of the sequence (as in @kbd{C-u u frombob RET}).
+Alternatively, you can use @kbd{M-u} (@code{mh-undo-folder}) to undo all
+refiles or deletes in the current folder.
+
+@findex @code{mh-execute-commands}
+
+If you've marked messages to be deleted or refiled and you want to go
+ahead and delete or refile the messages, use @kbd{x}
+(@code{mh-execute-commands}).  Many mh-e commands that may affect the
+numbering of the messages (such as @kbd{M-r} or @kbd{M-p}) will ask if you
+want to process refiles or deletes first and then either run @kbd{x} for
+you or undo the pending refiles and deletes, which are lost.
+
+@findex @code{mh-rmail}
+@findex @code{mh-quit}
+
+When you want to quit using mh-e and go back to editing, you can use the
+@kbd{q} (@code{mh-quit}) command.  This buries the buffers of the
+current mh-e folder and restores the buffers that were present when you
+first ran @kbd{M-x mh-rmail}.  You can later restore your mh-e session
+by selecting the @samp{+inbox} buffer or by running @kbd{M-x mh-rmail}
+again.
+
+@node Searching, Sequences, Moving Mail, Using mh-e
+@section Searching Through Messages
+
+@cindex searching
+@findex @code{mh-search-folder}
+
+You can search a folder for messages to or from a particular person or
+about a particular subject.  In fact, you can also search for messages
+containing selected strings in any arbitrary header field or any string
+found within the messages.  Use the @kbd{M-s} (@code{mh-search-folder})
+command.  You are first prompted for the name of the folder to search
+and then placed in the following buffer in MH-Pick mode:
+
+@example
+@group
+@cartouche
+From: #
+To:
+Cc:
+Date:
+Subject:
+--------
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+--**-Emacs: pick-pattern    (MH-Pick)------All----------------------------
+
+@end cartouche
+@i{Pick window}
+@end group
+@end example
+
+@cindex @code{pick}
+@cindex MH commands, @code{pick}
+
+Edit this template by entering your search criteria in an appropriate
+header field that is already there, or create a new field yourself.  If
+the string you're looking for could be anywhere in a message, then place
+the string underneath the row of dashes.  The @kbd{M-s} command uses the
+MH command @code{pick} to do the real work, so read @code{pick}(1) to
+find out more about how to enter t