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xemacs-devel / profile.el

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File profile.el

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 ;; In addition, call counts for each function called are recorded.
 ;; `profile-results' pretty-prints this information.
 
-;; Caveats (ELP users should read this):
+;; Note (ELP users should read this):
 ;;
-;; 1) The time reported is function time, rather than
-;;    function+descendants time;
-;; 2) Each tick is equivalent to 1ms (which can be changed), but this
-;;    is CPU time (user+kernel), not the real time;
-;; 3) Only the actual funcalls are profiled.  If, in the C code, a subr
-;;    Ffoo calls Fbar directly, using Fbar (), only Ffoo will appear in
+;; 1) Both function and function + descendants time are reported.
+;; 2) Number of times called is recorded for each function, as well as
+;;    Lisp allocation for the functions and for function + descendants.
+;; 3) The profiling entries include not only functions but also certain
+;;    common internal operations, such as redisplay, garbage collection,
+;;    byte-char conversion, internal-external conversion, etc.  Profiling
+;;    overhead is also recorded.
+;; 4) Each tick is equivalent to 1ms (which can be changed), but this
+;;    is CPU time (user+kernel), not the real time.
+;; 5) Only the actual funcalls are profiled.  If, in the C code, a subr
+;;    Ffoo calls Fbar directly, using Fbar(), only Ffoo will appear in
 ;;    the profile.
-;; 4) When profiling complex forms, more meaningful results are achieved
+;; 6) When profiling complex forms, more meaningful results are achieved
 ;;    by byte-compiling, e.g. with `compile-and-profile'.
+;; 7) Results will be skewed if your XEmacs is compiled with error-
+;;    checking.  The best thing is to compile with optimization and without
+;;    error-checking, before profiling.
+;; 8) If you call `profile-key-sequence' and then hit a sequence starting
+;;    with `M-x ...', the profiling will start from when you hit M-x,
+;;    and will include the reading of the rest of the command.
 
 ;; There are three levels of functions:
 ;;