Commits

adriana  committed 40e33b3

[xemacsweb PATCH] Improve batch-psgml-validate.el, fix HTML errors <u3dk869vf.fsf@ecf.teradyne.com>

  • Participants
  • Parent commits d0537e7

Comments (0)

Files changed (67)

File Architecting-XEmacs/ChangeLog

+2000-08-14  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
+
+	* xemacs-intro.content: Replace physical <b> with logical <strong>
+	markup.  Normalize and downcase tags for XML transition.  Hix HTML
+	errors.
+
 2000-08-04  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
 
 	* xemacs-tour.content: Make contents visible (they were not in NC

File Architecting-XEmacs/xemacs-intro.content

 %title%
 A Tour of XEmacs
-
 %author%
 Ben Wing
-
 %main%
-
-<!-- FONT SIZE=+1 ->
-<CENTER><H1>A Tour of XEmacs</H1></CENTER>
-
-<CENTER>Author: Ben Wing, <A HREF="mailto:ben@xemacs.org">ben@xemacs.org</A></CENTER>
-<P><I>(For more information, see <A HREF="http://www.xemacs.org/">http://www.xemacs.org/</A>.)</I>
-
-<H2>1. What is XEmacs?</H2>
-
-<H3>1.1 What Does It Look Like From a User's Perspective?</H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P>User interface elements:</P>
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P>buffers (a chunk of memory holding some text)</P>
-
-<LI><P>frames (window system windows): containing a menubar, a
-toolbar, one or more windows and a minibuffer</P>
-
-<LI><P>minibuffer (a line at the bottom of a frame where file names,
-search text, etc. are inputted and messages are displayed)</P>
-
-<LI><P>modelines (status lines directly below each pane of text,
-similar to the Netscape mailreader)</P>
-
-<LI><P>menus</P>
-
-<LI><P>windows (non-overlapping divisions of a frame, often called
-"panes" in other applications): consisting of a text area, a modeline
-and optionally horizontal and/or vertical scrollbars</P>
-
-<LI><P>toolbars</P>
-
-<LI><P>scrollbars</P>
-
-<LI><P>dialog boxes (not completely implemented, often the minibuffer
-is used instead)</P>
-
-</UL>
-
-
-<LI><P>file name and command auto-completion in the minibuffer</P>
-
-<LI><P>all behaviors can be customized (even changed completely) using
-the XEmacs Lisp extension language</P>
-
-<LI><P>full internationalization support under Unix, including Asian
-languages (and a single document can include any mixture of supported
-languages)</P>
-
-<LI><P>a huge library of installable packages&minus;&minus;for example:
-
-<UL>
-
-
-<LI>VM (a threaded mail reader)
-
-<LI>GNUS (a powerful threaded mail and news reader)
-
-<LI>shell buffers (a front end to shell/command line input that
-provides full XEmacs editing capabilities, file name and command
-completion, etc.)
-
-<LI>EFS (provides transparent access to FTP sites as if they were
-local file systems)
-
-<LI>W3 (a web browser)
-
-<LI>modes for all common programming languages, with automatic
-indentation, syntax highlighting, etc.
-
-<LI>lots of games (Tetris, Minesweeper, Adventure, etc.)
-
-<LI>interfaces to most debuggers
-
-<LI>etc.
-
-</UL><BR>
-
-
-<LI><P>behaviors of packages are extensively customizable just like
-for the editor itself</P>
-
-<LI><P> will simultaneously create frames on multiple X and TTY
-connections</P>
-</UL>
-
-<H3>1.2 How To Get More Information About XEmacs</H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P>web site is at
-
-<A HREF="http://www.xemacs.org">http://www.xemacs.org</A>; look at
-
-<A HREF= "http://www.xemacs.org/faq/"> http://www.xemacs.org/faq/</A>
-
-for the FAQ</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs itself is available from
-<A HREF="ftp://ftp.xemacs.org/pub/xemacs/">ftp://ftp.xemacs.org/pub/xemacs/</A></P>
-
-<LI><P>the newsgroup <A HREF="news:
-comp.emacs.xemacs">comp.emacs.xemacs</A> is devoted to XEmacs</P>
-
-<LI><P>the mailing lists devoted to XEmacs include <UL>
-
-<LI><P><A HREF="mailto:xemacs@xemacs.org">xemacs@xemacs.org</A>
-(bidirectionally gatewayed to and from comp.emacs.xemacs)
-
-<LI><P><A HREF="mailto:xemacs-beta@xemacs.org">xemacs-beta@xemacs.org</A>
-(primary mailing list for the development process of XEmacs)
-
-<LI><P><A HREF="mailto:xemacs-nt@xemacs.org">xemacs-nt@xemacs.org</A>
-(mailing list for the development of XEmacs under Microsoft Windows)
-
-<LI><P><A HREF="mailto:xemacs-announce@xemacs.org">xemacs-announce@xemacs.org</A>
-(low volume list for announcements)
-
-<LI><P><A HREF="mailto:xemacs-patches@xemacs.org">xemacs-patches@xemacs.org</A>
-(for submitting patches to the XEmacs sources)
-
-<LI><P><A HREF="mailto:xemacs-build-reports@xemacs.org">xemacs-build-reports@xemacs.org</A>
-(for build reports, success or failure&minus;&minus;please provide as much
-configuration information as possible)
-
-<LI><P>All lists are subscribed to and unsubscribed from using
-standard majordomo commands.  </UL><BR>
-
-<LI><P>One company that provides commercial support for XEmacs is
-Altrasoft, at
-
-<A HREF="http://www.altrasoft.com">http://www.altrasoft.com</A>
-
-</UL>
-
-<H3>1.3 Relations To Other Versions of Emacs</H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs was initially derived from a pre-alpha of GNU Emacs from
-the Free Software Foundation.</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs is not the same as GNU Emacs and is not developed by the
-Free Software Foundation, but is kept in sync with recent releases of
-GNU Emacs.</P>
-
-<LI><P>The name "XEmacs" has nothing to do with the X Window System,
-and in fact version 21.0 (soon to be released), supports Microsoft
-Windows as well; and all versions of XEmacs since 19.12 have included
-support for running in text (TTY) mode.</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs was called Lucid Emacs up through version 19.10.</P>
-
-</UL>
-
-<H3>1.4  Vital Statistics </H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P>authors
-
-<UL>
-
-
-<LI><P>initially Jamie Zawinski (19.0-19.10) and Richard Mlynarik
-(19.4-19.9)</P>
-
-<LI><P>after that, Chuck Thompson (19.8-19.14) and Ben Wing
-(19.8-19.14 and periodically after that)</P>
-
-<LI><P>currently (19.15-present), Steve Baur, Hrvoje Niksic, Kyle
-Jones, Kirill Katsnelson, Andy Piper, Martin Buchholz, Jonathan Harris
-and many others</P>
-
-</UL><BR>
-
-
-<LI><P>a relatively complete installation requires around 50 MB of
-disk space; a lean installation requires about 20 MB</P>
-
-<LI><P>a typical running XEmacs session involves around 10 MB of
-memory</P>
-
-<LI><P>supported platforms include all modern versions of Unix and
-many older ones; version 21.0 (scheduled to be released sometime in
-July) adds Microsoft Windows support</P>
-
-<LI><P>all of the source code to XEmacs is freely available, and is in
-fact required to be so under the GNU Public License</P>
-
-</UL>
-
-<H2>2. XEmacs Under the Hood</H2>
-
-<H3>2.1  XEmacs the Operating System</H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P><P>Internally, XEmacs does not look like an editor but consists
-primarily of just a Lisp interpreter, which is driven by a generalized
-event loop and redisplay mechanism similar to what you might find in
-the core of the X Window System (for example).</P>
-
-<LI><P>The XEmacs Lisp interpreter "just happens" to have support for
-some specialized objects, such as buffers, that can function as the
-components of an editor.</P>
-
-<LI><P>Most of the actual editor functionality is written in Lisp and
-is essentially an extension that sits on top of the XEmacs core.</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs can do very un-editorlike things; for example, try
-running XEmacs using the command <CODE>xemacs -batch -l
-dunnet</CODE>.</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs can even be made to look like vi and in fact it has been
-done numerous times. (The latest incarnation is called <EM>viper</EM>
-and supports a number of levels of vi compliance, allowing or
-disallowing various parts of XEmacs to show through.)</P>
-</UL>
-
-<H3>2.2  XEmacs Lisp</H3>
-
-<P>A typical XEmacs Lisp function looks something like this:
-<PRE><CODE>(defun zap-up-to-char (arg char)
-  "Kill up to ARG'th occurrence of CHAR.
-Goes backward if ARG is negative; error if CHAR not found."
-  (interactive "*p\ncZap up to char: ")
-  (kill-region (point) (progn
-                         (search-forward (char-to-string char) nil nil arg)
-                         (goto-char (if (> arg 0) (1- (point)) (1+ (point))))
-                         (point))))
-</CODE></PRE>
-
-<P>Some of the reasons why XEmacs uses Lisp are:
-
-<OL>
-
-<LI><P>The syntax is extremely regular.  All function calls, all
-operators and all syntactic constructs such as function definitions,
-<CODE>if</CODE> blocks and <CODE>while</CODE> blocks use the same
-format, which is a series of items enclosed by parentheses.</P>
-
-<LI><P>The basic data item, a list, is also used to represent pieces of
-code.  This makes it very easy to pass around chunks of code as data,
-which is very powerful and very useful in an extension
-language.</P>
-
-<LI><P>Allocated memory is automatically reclaimed using garbage
-collection.  There is no need to keep track of memory and explicitly
-free it as in C or C++.</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs Lisp is a safe language&minus;&minus;assuming that there are no bugs in
-the Lisp interpreter, it is impossible to write Lisp code that causes
-XEmacs to crash.  This is also unlike C or C++.  If an error occurs,
-the Lisp interpreter gracefully unwinds out of the code it has been
-executing and back to the top level, and typically prints an
-explanatory message in the minibuffer and then continues with the
-event loop.</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs Lisp is completely dynamically typed, meaning that all
-objects including integers and other numbers are tagged with their
-type at run time.  This makes it possible to write powerful functions
-with less programming effort than is required for C or C++ (which are
-almost entirely statically typed) or Java (where static typing is used
-for simple types like numbers and Boolean variables).</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs Lisp has powerful and well designed facilities for trapping
-and handling errors, exceptions and similar non-local exits.</P>
-
-<LI><P>Lisp has a long history as a well-designed and well-thought-out
-language that is designed for large and complex tasks as well as
-simple ones.  The latest incarnation of Lisp is Common Lisp and XEmacs
-Lisp is gradually incorporating more and more features of Common Lisp.</P>
-
-</OL>
-
-<P>Many more recently designed programming languages such as Perl,
-JavaScript, and Java address some but not all of these issues.  None
-of these languages address all of these issues, however, and at the
-time that Emacs was being developed these languages were not yet even
-a twinkling in the brain of their creators.</P>
-
-<P>Unfortunately, despite all of the shortcomings of Perl, Java, and
-JavaScript they are being developed much more actively than any
-varieties of Lisp and have been used much more as Web extension
-languages.  Consequently, new programmers are much more likely to be
-familiar with these languages than with Lisp, which makes writing
-XEmacs Lisp extensions harder than it should be.  For this reason the
-XEmacs developers have considered writing a more generalized scripting
-interface that would allow other languages to be used to write
-extensions in addition to Lisp. Doing this is a huge undertaking,
-however, and it may be many years before any such system is in place.</P>
-
-<H2>3. History of XEmacs; Split and Merge Attempts</H2>
-
-<H3>3.1  GNU Emacs History</H3>
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P><B>1970's</B>: Emacs begins life as a series of editor macros
-for TECO</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>Early 1980's</B>: Emacs rewritten in C as a collaboration
-between Richard M. Stallman (RMS) and James Gosling (the creator of
-Java)</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>1985</B>: RMS releases GNU Emacs 16 with all Gosling code
-removed</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>October 1986</B>: First release of GNU Emacs 18, supporting
-many different versions of Unix, but still only running on text
-terminals (TTY's)</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>1989?-1993</B>:Version 19, supporting the X window system,
-in planning for years and years
-</UL>
-<H3>3.2 XEmacs History</H3> <UL>
-
-<LI><P><B>1991</B>: Lucid Inc. contracts the Free Software Foundation
-(FSF) to enhance GNU Emacs for use with Lucid's C++ development
-environment Energize.</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>Early 1992</B>: Major collaboration problems and delays
-cause Lucid to break with the FSF</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>April 1992</B>: Lucid Emacs 19.0 released</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>Beginning of 1993</B>: Sun Microsystems collaborates with
-University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) to produce a version
-of Emacs called ERA ("Emacs rewritten again") for use with an
-integrated development environment; based off of Lucid Emacs</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>May 1993</B>: First release of GNU Emacs version 19</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>September 1993</B>: Lucid Emacs merges with ERA; Lucid Emacs
-19.8 released</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>1994</B>: Sun wants Lucid's name to not be in the editor;
-marketing types choose questionable name XEmacs</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>June 1994</B>: Lucid Emacs 19.10 released; Lucid goes
-bankrupt; Jamie Zawinski, primary Lucid Emacs maintainer joins
-Netscape (is now the evangelist for mozilla.org)</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>September 1994</B>: XEmacs 19.11 released, maintainer duties
-passed to Chuck Thompson and Ben Wing</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>1994-1995</B>: XEmacs splits into versions 19 and 20 to
-facilitate these changes; other support provided by Amdahl and INS
-Engineering</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>September 1995</B>: XEmacs 19.13 released; major internal
-rewriting by Ben Wing (internationalization, multiple device support
-and more powerful image support) and Chuck Thompson (redisplay)</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>1996</B>: Sun cuts back on funding; Ben Wing and Chuck
-Thompson leave for other projects; XEmacs lies dormant but is revived
-by new maintainer Steve Baur</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>February 1997</B>: XEmacs 20.0 released; first release with
-international support</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>1997</B>: Sun drops funding entirely, some funding from
-Altrasoft</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>1997-1998</B>: Steve Baur rebuilds XEmacs development and
-recruits a large team of core developers based in many countries&minus;&minus;both
-coasts of the US, Canada, England, France, Germany, England, Croatia,
-and Russia.</P>
-
-<LI><P><B>1993 to present</B>: XEmacs borrows and synchronizes code
-from GNU Emacs version 19 and 20, in the spirit of the "open source"
-model of free software development; RMS does not allow code borrowing
-in the other direction due to self-imposed copyright assignment
-restrictions.
-</UL>
-<H3>3.3  Merge Attempts</H3>
-
-<P>Since the initial split between Lucid Emacs and GNU Emacs, many
-attempts at merging the two products have been made.  Both sides agree
-that it would be nice if development efforts could be consolidated,
-and there have been at least two major merge discussions made over the
-years, each involving hundreds of email messages exchanged between RMS
-and the developers of Lucid Emacs/XEmacs.  Unfortunately, in all cases
-talks have broken down over irreconcilable differences, including:
-
-<P>		<DL>
-
-<DT><B>Control</B> <DD> RMS has difficulty sharing control of programs
-that he is actively working on; and especially with Emacs, which was
-the first GNU program and which he considers his "baby".</P>
-
-<DT><B>Corporate involvement</B><DD> Although XEmacs is and has always
-been free, it has often been funded by corporations, and RMS is not
-willing to work with corporations or honor their priorities.</P>
-
-<DT><B>Copyright assignments</B><DD> Because of the copyright
-assignment problems mentioned earlier, much of the XEmacs code would
-have to be thrown away and rewritten so as to satisfy FSF copyright
-assignment rules.</P>
-
-<DT> <B>Coding philosophy differences</B><DD> Most of XEmacs is
-designed around the modern programming principles of data abstraction,
-data hiding, and modularization, and the XEmacs developers follow
-these practices.  This translates into a large amount of
-infrastructure and many levels of indirection and it makes the code
-harder to understand if you are not familiar with it and just look at
-a small part of it; however, it makes the code infinitely more
-maintainable in the presence of a large and ever changing set of
-developers.  RMS does not like data abstraction; from his perspective
-as the primary and only consistent maintainer of GNU Emacs, data
-abstraction adds a whole lot of code that apparently does nothing, and
-without it code is smaller and seemingly more simple.  RMS's method of
-coding also greatly increases the number of interdependencies between
-different parts of the code, which would normally create an impossible
-maintenance headache, but is apparently not a problem for RMS.  This
-philosophical difference not only makes collaboration more difficult,
-but it has also caused almost all of the Lisp extension interfaces
-that have been added in the last six years to be designed
-incompatibly&minus;&minus;in XEmacs, a new programming concept usually causes the
-creation of a new abstract data type, whereas in GNU Emacs, the basic
-non-abstract Lisp data types such as lists and vectors are
-reused.</P>
-
-</DL>
-
-<H2>4.  Newest Features </H2>
-
-<H3>4.1 Features of Note in the About-to-be-Released Version 21.0</H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P>Support for installable packages, similar to packages under Red
-Hat; the idea is that many more extension packages can be made
-available in an easy-to-install form, but don't need to be part of the
-main distribution, and can be updated independent of the main
-releases.</P>
-
-<LI><P>Full support under Microsoft Windows 95 and NT.</P>
-
-<LI><P>Better Options menu support, rewritten to use the standard
-<EM>custom</EM> interface.</P>
-
-<LI><P>No limit on the amount of buffer data (previously was 256 MG on
-a 32 bit machine, now can use the full 4 GB if available) .
-</UL>
-
-<H3>4.2  Features to Come in the Near Future</H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P>internationalization support under Windows</P>
-
-<LI><P>full dialog boxes</P>
-
-<LI><P>some support for the emerging Unicode internationalization
-standard</P>
-
-<LI><P>better organized bug reporting process</P>
-
-<LI><P>replacement of the notoriously complex and system-specific
-unexec mechanism with a general and more reliable mechanism</P>
-
-<LI><P> many improvements that make XEmacs easier to customize
-</UL>
-
-<H3>4.3  Features Further Off in the Future</H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P>full support for Unicode</P>
-
-<LI><P>ability to dynamically link C libraries into a running XEmacs</P>
-
-<LI><P>possible replacement of or significant revision to the aging
-Lisp engine, including such modern features as multithreading, lexical
-scoping, full Common Lisp support and faster byte code execution
-(possibly including just-in-time compilation)</P>
-
-</UL>
-
-<H2>5. Comparison to vi, IDE Editors, and GNU Emacs </H2>
-
-<H3>5.1  Comparison to vi</H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P>vi is lean and mean, quick to start up; XEmacs is the "kitchen
-sink" and slow to start up</P>
-
-<LI><P>vi is a two mode editor where you have to switch between modes
-to insert text and to move around and change text, and the same keys
-are used for both purposes; XEmacs is a one mode editor, where the
-ASCII keys always insert themselves as text, and commands are given
-using control characters</P>
-
-<LI><P>vi is an editor and only an editor, whereas XEmacs purports to
-be a whole environment, almost an operating system</P>
-
-<LI><P>traditional versions of vi support editing in only one buffer
-(file), one frame and one window at a time; XEmacs allows many or all
-of these at a time</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs is more customizable</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs generally provides many more GUI elements</P>
-
-<LI><P>the editors use very different approaches and neither is
-"better" than the other; I and many other people use both depending on
-the circumstance
-</UL>
-
-<H3>5.2  Comparison to IDE Editors</H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P>IDE editors generally provide a more GUI-centric environment
-and closer integration with specific compiling and debugging
-products.</P>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs needs a bit of work in some GUI areas (especially dialog
-boxes)</P>
-
-<LI><P>IDE editors are generally not very customizable, whereas XEmacs
-is almost infinitely customizable.</P>
-
-<LI><P>IDE editors generally integrate only with the tools that they
-were designed to integrate with, and work only with the languages that
-they were designed to work with; whereas XEmacs is much more general.</P>
-</UL>
-
-<H3>5.3  Comparison to GNU Emacs</H3>
-
-<UL>
-
-<LI><P>XEmacs provides many GUI elements that are missing or
-minimalistic in GNU Emacs, such as toolbars, scrollbars, a mousable
-mode line, dialog boxes, etc.  There is also a more powerful interface
-for programming these and other GUI elements.</P>
-
-<LI><P> XEmacs comes with many more packages integrated, and as of the
-soon-to-be-released version 21.0, a powerful, installable package
-system.</P>
-
-<LI><P> Pre-built binary distributions are provided for most
-platforms.</P>
-
-<LI><P>The XEmacs development process is much more "bazaar"-like than
-GNU Emacs [see "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" by Eric
-Raymond]&minus;&minus;development is by a team instead of primarily by a single
-person, code and submissions are more likely to be accepted (and it is
-not required to sign copyright assignment papers), there is no bias
-against packages that integrate with proprietary products, etc.</P>
-
-<LI><P> XEmacs allows for simultaneous X and TTY connections&minus;&minus;for
-example, you could leave your XEmacs session running at work and then
-telnet into a machine from home, and, using the <CODE>gnuclient
--nw</CODE> command, open up a TTY frame in the same XEmacs session,
-using the same open buffers, session settings, etc.</P>
-
-</UL>
-
-</FONT>
-
-
+            <h1>A Tour of XEmacs</h1>
+            <center>Author: Ben Wing, <a href="mailto:ben@xemacs.org">ben@xemacs.org</a></center>
+            <p><i>(For more information, see <a href="http://www.xemacs.org/">http://www.xemacs.org/</a>.)</i></p>
+            <h2>1. What is XEmacs?</h2>
+            <h3>1.1 What Does It Look Like From a User's Perspective?</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>User interface elements:</p>
+                <ul>
+                  <li><p>buffers (a chunk of memory holding some text)</p></li>
+                  <li><p>frames (window system windows): containing a menubar, a
+                      toolbar, one or more windows and a minibuffer</p></li>
+                  <li><p>minibuffer (a line at the bottom of a frame where file names,
+                      search text, etc. are inputted and messages are displayed)</p></li>
+                  <li><p>modelines (status lines directly below each pane of text,
+                      similar to the Netscape mailreader)</p></li>
+                  <li><p>menus</p></li>
+                  <li><p>windows (non-overlapping divisions of a frame, often called
+                      "panes" in other applications): consisting of a text area, a modeline
+                      and optionally horizontal and/or vertical scrollbars</p></li>
+                  <li><p>toolbars</p></li>
+                  <li><p>scrollbars</p></li>
+                  <li><p>dialog boxes (not completely implemented, often the minibuffer
+                      is used instead)</p></li>
+                </ul></li>
+              <li><p>file name and command auto-completion in the minibuffer</p></li>
+              <li><p>all behaviors can be customized (even changed completely) using
+                  the XEmacs Lisp extension language</p></li>
+              <li><p>full internationalization support under Unix, including Asian
+                  languages (and a single document can include any mixture of supported
+                  languages)</p></li>
+              <li><p>a huge library of installable packages&minus;&minus;for example:</p>
+                <ul>
+                  <li>VM (a threaded mail reader)</li>
+                  <li>GNUS (a powerful threaded mail and news reader)</li>
+                  <li>shell buffers (a front end to shell/command line input that
+                    provides full XEmacs editing capabilities, file name and command
+                    completion, etc.)</li>
+                  <li>EFS (provides transparent access to FTP sites as if they were
+                    local file systems)</li>
+                  <li>W3 (a web browser)</li>
+                  <li>modes for all common programming languages, with automatic
+                    indentation, syntax highlighting, etc.</li>
+                  <li>lots of games (Tetris, Minesweeper, Adventure, etc.)</li>
+                  <li>interfaces to most debuggers</li>
+                  <li>etc.</li>
+                </ul><br></li>
+              <li><p>behaviors of packages are extensively customizable just like
+                  for the editor itself</p></li>
+              <li><p> will simultaneously create frames on multiple X and TTY
+                  connections</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h3>1.2 How To Get More Information About XEmacs</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>web site is at
+                  <a href="http://www.xemacs.org">http://www.xemacs.org</a>; look at
+                  <a href="http://www.xemacs.org/faq/"> http://www.xemacs.org/faq/</a>
+                  for the FAQ</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs itself is available from
+                  <a href="ftp://ftp.xemacs.org/pub/xemacs/">ftp://ftp.xemacs.org/pub/xemacs/</a></p></li>
+              <li><p>the newsgroup <a href="news:
+                                      comp.emacs.xemacs">comp.emacs.xemacs</a> is devoted to XEmacs</p></li>
+              <li><p>the mailing lists devoted to XEmacs include</p> <ul>
+                  <li><p><a href="mailto:xemacs@xemacs.org">xemacs@xemacs.org</a>
+                      (bidirectionally gatewayed to and from comp.emacs.xemacs)</p></li>
+                  <li><p><a href="mailto:xemacs-beta@xemacs.org">xemacs-beta@xemacs.org</a>
+                      (primary mailing list for the development process of XEmacs)</p></li>
+                  <li><p><a href="mailto:xemacs-nt@xemacs.org">xemacs-nt@xemacs.org</a>
+                      (mailing list for the development of XEmacs under Microsoft Windows)</p></li>
+                  <li><p><a href="mailto:xemacs-announce@xemacs.org">xemacs-announce@xemacs.org</a>
+                      (low volume list for announcements)</p></li>
+                  <li><p><a href="mailto:xemacs-patches@xemacs.org">xemacs-patches@xemacs.org</a>
+                      (for submitting patches to the XEmacs sources)</p></li>
+                  <li><p><a href="mailto:xemacs-build-reports@xemacs.org">xemacs-build-reports@xemacs.org</a>
+                      (for build reports, success or failure&minus;&minus;please provide as much
+                      configuration information as possible)</p></li>
+                  <li><p>All lists are subscribed to and unsubscribed from using
+                      standard majordomo commands.</p></li>  </ul><br></li>
+              <li><p>One company that provides commercial support for XEmacs is
+                  Altrasoft, at
+                  <a href="http://www.altrasoft.com">http://www.altrasoft.com</a></p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h3>1.3 Relations To Other Versions of Emacs</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>XEmacs was initially derived from a pre-alpha of GNU Emacs from
+                  the Free Software Foundation.</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs is not the same as GNU Emacs and is not developed by the
+                  Free Software Foundation, but is kept in sync with recent releases of
+                  GNU Emacs.</p></li>
+              <li><p>The name "XEmacs" has nothing to do with the X Window System,
+                  and in fact version 21.0 (soon to be released), supports Microsoft
+                  Windows as well; and all versions of XEmacs since 19.12 have included
+                  support for running in text (TTY) mode.</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs was called Lucid Emacs up through version 19.10.</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h3>1.4  Vital Statistics </h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>authors</p>
+                <ul>
+                  <li><p>initially Jamie Zawinski (19.0-19.10) and Richard Mlynarik
+                      (19.4-19.9)</p></li>
+                  <li><p>after that, Chuck Thompson (19.8-19.14) and Ben Wing
+                      (19.8-19.14 and periodically after that)</p></li>
+                  <li><p>currently (19.15-present), Steve Baur, Hrvoje Niksic, Kyle
+                      Jones, Kirill Katsnelson, Andy Piper, Martin Buchholz, Jonathan Harris
+                      and many others</p></li>
+                </ul><br></li>
+              <li><p>a relatively complete installation requires around 50 MB of
+                  disk space; a lean installation requires about 20 MB</p></li>
+              <li><p>a typical running XEmacs session involves around 10 MB of
+                  memory</p></li>
+              <li><p>supported platforms include all modern versions of Unix and
+                  many older ones; version 21.0 (scheduled to be released sometime in
+                  July) adds Microsoft Windows support</p></li>
+              <li><p>all of the source code to XEmacs is freely available, and is in
+                  fact required to be so under the GNU Public License</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h2>2. XEmacs Under the Hood</h2>
+            <h3>2.1  XEmacs the Operating System</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>Internally, XEmacs does not look like an editor but consists
+                  primarily of just a Lisp interpreter, which is driven by a generalized
+                  event loop and redisplay mechanism similar to what you might find in
+                  the core of the X Window System (for example).</p></li>
+              <li><p>The XEmacs Lisp interpreter "just happens" to have support for
+                  some specialized objects, such as buffers, that can function as the
+                  components of an editor.</p></li>
+              <li><p>Most of the actual editor functionality is written in Lisp and
+                  is essentially an extension that sits on top of the XEmacs core.</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs can do very un-editorlike things; for example, try
+                  running XEmacs using the command <code>xemacs -batch -l
+                    dunnet</code>.</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs can even be made to look like vi and in fact it has been
+                  done numerous times. (The latest incarnation is called <em>viper</em>
+                  and supports a number of levels of vi compliance, allowing or
+                  disallowing various parts of XEmacs to show through.)</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h3>2.2  XEmacs Lisp</h3>
+            <p>A typical XEmacs Lisp function looks something like this:</p>
+            <pre><code>(defun zap-up-to-char (arg char)
+                "Kill up to ARG'th occurrence of CHAR.
+                Goes backward if ARG is negative; error if CHAR not found."
+                (interactive "*p\ncZap up to char: ")
+                (kill-region (point) (progn
+                (search-forward (char-to-string char) nil nil arg)
+                (goto-char (if (> arg 0) (1- (point)) (1+ (point))))
+                (point))))
+</code></pre>
+            <p>Some of the reasons why XEmacs uses Lisp are:</p>
+            <ol>
+              <li><p>The syntax is extremely regular.  All function calls, all
+                  operators and all syntactic constructs such as function definitions,
+                  <code>if</code> blocks and <code>while</code> blocks use the same
+                  format, which is a series of items enclosed by parentheses.</p></li>
+              <li><p>The basic data item, a list, is also used to represent pieces of
+                  code.  This makes it very easy to pass around chunks of code as data,
+                  which is very powerful and very useful in an extension
+                  language.</p></li>
+              <li><p>Allocated memory is automatically reclaimed using garbage
+                  collection.  There is no need to keep track of memory and explicitly
+                  free it as in C or C++.</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs Lisp is a safe language&minus;&minus;assuming that there are no bugs in
+                  the Lisp interpreter, it is impossible to write Lisp code that causes
+                  XEmacs to crash.  This is also unlike C or C++.  If an error occurs,
+                  the Lisp interpreter gracefully unwinds out of the code it has been
+                  executing and back to the top level, and typically prints an
+                  explanatory message in the minibuffer and then continues with the
+                  event loop.</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs Lisp is completely dynamically typed, meaning that all
+                  objects including integers and other numbers are tagged with their
+                  type at run time.  This makes it possible to write powerful functions
+                  with less programming effort than is required for C or C++ (which are
+                  almost entirely statically typed) or Java (where static typing is used
+                  for simple types like numbers and Boolean variables).</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs Lisp has powerful and well designed facilities for trapping
+                  and handling errors, exceptions and similar non-local exits.</p></li>
+              <li><p>Lisp has a long history as a well-designed and well-thought-out
+                  language that is designed for large and complex tasks as well as
+                  simple ones.  The latest incarnation of Lisp is Common Lisp and XEmacs
+                  Lisp is gradually incorporating more and more features of Common Lisp.</p></li>
+            </ol>
+            <p>Many more recently designed programming languages such as Perl,
+              JavaScript, and Java address some but not all of these issues.  None
+              of these languages address all of these issues, however, and at the
+              time that Emacs was being developed these languages were not yet even
+              a twinkling in the brain of their creators.</p>
+            <p>Unfortunately, despite all of the shortcomings of Perl, Java, and
+              JavaScript they are being developed much more actively than any
+              varieties of Lisp and have been used much more as Web extension
+              languages.  Consequently, new programmers are much more likely to be
+              familiar with these languages than with Lisp, which makes writing
+              XEmacs Lisp extensions harder than it should be.  For this reason the
+              XEmacs developers have considered writing a more generalized scripting
+              interface that would allow other languages to be used to write
+              extensions in addition to Lisp. Doing this is a huge undertaking,
+              however, and it may be many years before any such system is in place.</p>
+            <h2>3. History of XEmacs; Split and Merge Attempts</h2>
+            <h3>3.1  GNU Emacs History</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p><strong>1970's</strong>: Emacs begins life as a series of editor macros
+                  for TECO</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>Early 1980's</strong>: Emacs rewritten in C as a collaboration
+                  between Richard M. Stallman (RMS) and James Gosling (the creator of
+                  Java)</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>1985</strong>: RMS releases GNU Emacs 16 with all Gosling code
+                  removed</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>October 1986</strong>: First release of GNU Emacs 18, supporting
+                  many different versions of Unix, but still only running on text
+                  terminals (TTY's)</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>1989?-1993</strong>:Version 19, supporting the X window system,
+                  in planning for years and years</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h3>3.2 XEmacs History</h3> <ul>
+              <li><p><strong>1991</strong>: Lucid Inc. contracts the Free Software Foundation
+                  (FSF) to enhance GNU Emacs for use with Lucid's C++ development
+                  environment Energize.</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>Early 1992</strong>: Major collaboration problems and delays
+                  cause Lucid to break with the FSF</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>April 1992</strong>: Lucid Emacs 19.0 released</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>Beginning of 1993</strong>: Sun Microsystems collaborates with
+                  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) to produce a version
+                  of Emacs called ERA ("Emacs rewritten again") for use with an
+                  integrated development environment; based off of Lucid Emacs</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>May 1993</strong>: First release of GNU Emacs version 19</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>September 1993</strong>: Lucid Emacs merges with ERA; Lucid Emacs
+                  19.8 released</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>1994</strong>: Sun wants Lucid's name to not be in the editor;
+                  marketing types choose questionable name XEmacs</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>June 1994</strong>: Lucid Emacs 19.10 released; Lucid goes
+                  bankrupt; Jamie Zawinski, primary Lucid Emacs maintainer joins
+                  Netscape (is now the evangelist for mozilla.org)</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>September 1994</strong>: XEmacs 19.11 released, maintainer duties
+                  passed to Chuck Thompson and Ben Wing</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>1994-1995</strong>: XEmacs splits into versions 19 and 20 to
+                  facilitate these changes; other support provided by Amdahl and INS
+                  Engineering</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>September 1995</strong>: XEmacs 19.13 released; major internal
+                  rewriting by Ben Wing (internationalization, multiple device support
+                  and more powerful image support) and Chuck Thompson (redisplay)</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>1996</strong>: Sun cuts back on funding; Ben Wing and Chuck
+                  Thompson leave for other projects; XEmacs lies dormant but is revived
+                  by new maintainer Steve Baur</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>February 1997</strong>: XEmacs 20.0 released; first release with
+                  international support</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>1997</strong>: Sun drops funding entirely, some funding from
+                  Altrasoft</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>1997-1998</strong>: Steve Baur rebuilds XEmacs development and
+                  recruits a large team of core developers based in many countries&minus;&minus;both
+                  coasts of the US, Canada, England, France, Germany, England, Croatia,
+                  and Russia.</p></li>
+              <li><p><strong>1993 to present</strong>: XEmacs borrows and synchronizes code
+                  from GNU Emacs version 19 and 20, in the spirit of the "open source"
+                  model of free software development; RMS does not allow code borrowing
+                  in the other direction due to self-imposed copyright assignment
+                  restrictions.</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h3>3.3  Merge Attempts</h3>
+            <p>Since the initial split between Lucid Emacs and GNU Emacs, many
+              attempts at merging the two products have been made.  Both sides agree
+              that it would be nice if development efforts could be consolidated,
+              and there have been at least two major merge discussions made over the
+              years, each involving hundreds of email messages exchanged between RMS
+              and the developers of Lucid Emacs/XEmacs.  Unfortunately, in all cases
+              talks have broken down over irreconcilable differences, including:</p>
+            <dl>
+              <dt><strong>Control</strong></dt><dd><p>RMS has difficulty sharing control of programs
+                  that he is actively working on; and especially with Emacs, which was
+                  the first GNU program and which he considers his "baby".</p></dd>
+              <dt><strong>Corporate involvement</strong></dt><dd><p>Although XEmacs is and has always
+                  been free, it has often been funded by corporations, and RMS is not
+                  willing to work with corporations or honor their priorities.</p></dd>
+              <dt><strong>Copyright assignments</strong></dt><dd><p>Because of the copyright
+                  assignment problems mentioned earlier, much of the XEmacs code would
+                  have to be thrown away and rewritten so as to satisfy FSF copyright
+                  assignment rules.</p></dd>
+              <dt><strong>Coding philosophy differences</strong></dt><dd><p>Most of XEmacs is
+                  designed around the modern programming principles of data abstraction,
+                  data hiding, and modularization, and the XEmacs developers follow
+                  these practices.  This translates into a large amount of
+                  infrastructure and many levels of indirection and it makes the code
+                  harder to understand if you are not familiar with it and just look at
+                  a small part of it; however, it makes the code infinitely more
+                  maintainable in the presence of a large and ever changing set of
+                  developers.  RMS does not like data abstraction; from his perspective
+                  as the primary and only consistent maintainer of GNU Emacs, data
+                  abstraction adds a whole lot of code that apparently does nothing, and
+                  without it code is smaller and seemingly more simple.  RMS's method of
+                  coding also greatly increases the number of interdependencies between
+                  different parts of the code, which would normally create an impossible
+                  maintenance headache, but is apparently not a problem for RMS.  This
+                  philosophical difference not only makes collaboration more difficult,
+                  but it has also caused almost all of the Lisp extension interfaces
+                  that have been added in the last six years to be designed
+                  incompatibly&minus;&minus;in XEmacs, a new programming concept usually causes the
+                  creation of a new abstract data type, whereas in GNU Emacs, the basic
+                  non-abstract Lisp data types such as lists and vectors are
+                  reused.</p></dd>
+            </dl>
+            <h2>4.  Newest Features </h2>
+            <h3>4.1 Features of Note in the About-to-be-Released Version 21.0</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>Support for installable packages, similar to packages under Red
+                  Hat; the idea is that many more extension packages can be made
+                  available in an easy-to-install form, but don't need to be part of the
+                  main distribution, and can be updated independent of the main
+                  releases.</p></li>
+              <li><p>Full support under Microsoft Windows 95 and NT.</p></li>
+              <li><p>Better Options menu support, rewritten to use the standard
+                  <em>custom</em> interface.</p></li>
+              <li><p>No limit on the amount of buffer data (previously was 256 MG on
+                  a 32 bit machine, now can use the full 4 GB if available) .</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h3>4.2  Features to Come in the Near Future</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>internationalization support under Windows</p></li>
+              <li><p>full dialog boxes</p></li>
+              <li><p>some support for the emerging Unicode internationalization
+                  standard</p></li>
+              <li><p>better organized bug reporting process</p></li>
+              <li><p>replacement of the notoriously complex and system-specific
+                  unexec mechanism with a general and more reliable mechanism</p></li>
+              <li><p> many improvements that make XEmacs easier to customize</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h3>4.3  Features Further Off in the Future</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>full support for Unicode</p></li>
+              <li><p>ability to dynamically link C libraries into a running XEmacs</p></li>
+              <li><p>possible replacement of or significant revision to the aging
+                  Lisp engine, including such modern features as multithreading, lexical
+                  scoping, full Common Lisp support and faster byte code execution
+                  (possibly including just-in-time compilation)</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h2>5. Comparison to vi, IDE Editors, and GNU Emacs </h2>
+            <h3>5.1  Comparison to vi</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>vi is lean and mean, quick to start up; XEmacs is the "kitchen
+                  sink" and slow to start up</p></li>
+              <li><p>vi is a two mode editor where you have to switch between modes
+                  to insert text and to move around and change text, and the same keys
+                  are used for both purposes; XEmacs is a one mode editor, where the
+                  ASCII keys always insert themselves as text, and commands are given
+                  using control characters</p></li>
+              <li><p>vi is an editor and only an editor, whereas XEmacs purports to
+                  be a whole environment, almost an operating system</p></li>
+              <li><p>traditional versions of vi support editing in only one buffer
+                  (file), one frame and one window at a time; XEmacs allows many or all
+                  of these at a time</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs is more customizable</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs generally provides many more GUI elements</p></li>
+              <li><p>the editors use very different approaches and neither is
+                  "better" than the other; I and many other people use both depending on
+                  the circumstance</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h3>5.2  Comparison to IDE Editors</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>IDE editors generally provide a more GUI-centric environment
+                  and closer integration with specific compiling and debugging
+                  products.</p></li>
+              <li><p>XEmacs needs a bit of work in some GUI areas (especially dialog
+                  boxes)</p></li>
+              <li><p>IDE editors are generally not very customizable, whereas XEmacs
+                  is almost infinitely customizable.</p></li>
+              <li><p>IDE editors generally integrate only with the tools that they
+                  were designed to integrate with, and work only with the languages that
+                  they were designed to work with; whereas XEmacs is much more general.</p></li>
+            </ul>
+            <h3>5.3  Comparison to GNU Emacs</h3>
+            <ul>
+              <li><p>XEmacs provides many GUI elements that are missing or
+                  minimalistic in GNU Emacs, such as toolbars, scrollbars, a mousable
+                  mode line, dialog boxes, etc.  There is also a more powerful interface
+                  for programming these and other GUI elements.</p></li>
+              <li><p> XEmacs comes with many more packages integrated, and as of the
+                  soon-to-be-released version 21.0, a powerful, installable package
+                  system.</p></li>
+              <li><p> Pre-built binary distributions are provided for most
+                  platforms.</p></li>
+              <li><p>The XEmacs development process is much more "bazaar"-like than
+                  GNU Emacs [see "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" by Eric
+                  Raymond]&minus;&minus;development is by a team instead of primarily by a single
+                  person, code and submissions are more likely to be accepted (and it is
+                  not required to sign copyright assignment papers), there is no bias
+                  against packages that integrate with proprietary products, etc.</p></li>
+              <li><p> XEmacs allows for simultaneous X and TTY connections&minus;&minus;for
+                  example, you could leave your XEmacs session running at work and then
+                  telnet into a machine from home, and, using the <code>gnuclient
+                    -nw</code> command, open up a TTY frame in the same XEmacs session,
+                  using the same open buffers, session settings, etc.</p></li>
+            </ul>
+2000-08-14  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
+
+	* Makefile (FLAGS): Use -vanilla instead of -q -no-site-file.
+	* batch-psgml-validate.el: Load "psgml-parse" and "psgml-html".
+	* batch-psgml-validate.el (psgml-validate-non-conform): Remove
+	trailing WS.
+	* batch-psgml-validate.el (psgml-validate-ignore-directories): Add
+	"RSC" "SCCS".
+	* batch-psgml-validate.el (batch-psgml-last-warning): New.  See
+	`batch-psgml-validate-log-warning'.
+	* batch-psgml-validate.el (batch-psgml-validate): Move ignoring
+	directories and validation progress reporting to
+	`batch-psgml-validate-file'.
+	* batch-psgml-validate.el (batch-psgml-validate-file): See
+	`batch-psgml-validate'.
+	* batch-psgml-validate.el (batch-psgml-validate-buffer): Improve
+	error reporting, fix determination of DTD of document (might not
+	work with XML).
+	* batch-psgml-validate.el (batch-psgml-validate-log-warning): New.
+	Encapsulate `sgml-log-warning' to set `batch-psgml-last-warning'.
+	* batch-psgml-validate.el (batch-psgml-validate-message): New.
+	Encapsulate `sgml-message' to shut it up.
+	* index.content: Fix link to stable release announcement.
+	* template.html: Correct DTD in conformity notice by running "make
+	validate".
+
 2000-08-12  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
 
 	* Makefile (genpage-time-stamp): Add template.html dependency.

File FAQ/ChangeLog

+2000-08-14  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
+
+	* index.content: Fix incorrect comment syntax.
+	* xemacs-faq.html: Correct DTD in conformity notice by running
+	"make validate".
+	* xemacs-faq_1.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_2.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_3.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_4.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_5.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_6.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_7.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_8.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_toc.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-new.html: Ditto.
+
 2000-08-09  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
 
 	* xemacs-new.html: Update "Last modified" line.

File FAQ/index.content

 <!--
 <P><HR><P>
 Go to the first, previous, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_2.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
->
+-->

File FAQ/old/ChangeLog

+2000-08-14  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
+
+	* XEmacs-FAQ-changes.html: Correct DTD in conformity notice by
+	running "make validate".
+	* index.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-current.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-customization.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-deleted.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-installation.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-merge.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-miscellaneous.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-subsystems.html: Ditto.
+
 2000-08-12  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
 
 	* index.html: Upgrade to DTD HTML 4.0 and validate with

File FAQ/old/XEmacs-FAQ-changes.html

       <LI> Added toolbar document linkage (June 6)
       <LI> Added graphical navigational buttons for trailing-edge browsers (June 7)
     </OL>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/old/index.html

       <A HREF="mailto:andreas@sccon.com">&lt;andreas@sccon.com&gt;</A>.
     <P>
       <A HREF="xemacs-installation.html"><IMG SRC="right-purple.gif" ALT=" Part 2 =>"></A>
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN"&gt;
-        , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/old/xemacs-current.html

       <A HREF="mailto:andreas@sccon.com">&lt;andreas@sccon.com&gt;</A>.
     <P>
       <A HREF="xemacs-miscellaneous.html"><IMG SRC="left-purple.gif" ALT="<= Part 5"></A>
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/old/xemacs-customization.html

     <P>
       <A HREF="xemacs-installation.html"><IMG SRC="left-purple.gif" ALT="<= Part 2 "></A>
       <A HREF="xemacs-subsystems.html"><IMG SRC="right-purple.gif" ALT=" Part 4 =>"></A>
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/old/xemacs-deleted.html

     <H2><IMG SRC="cy_ball.gif" ALT="Subject: ">
       <A NAME="Q3_3_6">Q3.3.6 How can I get the column count to start at 1 rather than 0?</A></H2>
     As of XEmacs 19.14 it does.
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/old/xemacs-faq.html

     <P>
       <A HREF="xemacs-installation.html">
         <IMG SRC="right-purple.gif" ALT=" Part 2 =>"></A>
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/old/xemacs-installation.html

     <P>
       <A HREF="xemacs-faq.html"><IMG SRC="left-purple.gif" ALT="<= Part 1 "></A>
       <A HREF="xemacs-customization.html"><IMG SRC="right-purple.gif" ALT=" Part 3 =>"></A>
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/old/xemacs-merge.html

 "... then the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was
 more painful than the risk it took to blossom." -- Anais Nin
     </PRE>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/old/xemacs-miscellaneous.html

     <P>
       <A HREF="xemacs-subsystems.html"><IMG SRC="left-purple.gif" ALT="<= Part 4 "></A>
       <A HREF="xemacs-current.html"><IMG SRC="right-purple.gif" ALT=" Part 6 =>"></A>
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/old/xemacs-subsystems.html

     <P>
       <A HREF="xemacs-customization.html"><IMG SRC="left-purple.gif" ALT="<= Part 3 "></A>
       <A HREF="xemacs-miscellaneous.html"><IMG SRC="right-purple.gif" ALT=" Part 5 =>"></A>
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/oldstuff/ChangeLog

+2000-08-14  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
+
+	* index.html: Correct DTD in conformity notice by running "make
+	validate".
+	* xemacs-faq_1.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_2.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_3.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_4.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_5.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_6.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_7.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_8.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_toc.html: Ditto.
+
 2000-07-30  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
 
 	* index.html: Comply with XEmacs website indentation standard.

File FAQ/oldstuff/index.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the first, previous, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_2.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/oldstuff/xemacs-faq_1.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the first, previous, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_2.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/oldstuff/xemacs-faq_2.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_3.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/oldstuff/xemacs-faq_3.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_2.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_4.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/oldstuff/xemacs-faq_4.html

     </P>
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_3.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_5.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/oldstuff/xemacs-faq_5.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_4.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_6.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/oldstuff/xemacs-faq_6.html

     </P>
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_5.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_7.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/oldstuff/xemacs-faq_7.html

     </P>
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_6.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/oldstuff/xemacs-faq_8.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_7.html">previous</A>, next, last section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/oldstuff/xemacs-faq_toc.html

       This document was generated on 4 May 1999 using the
       <A HREF="http://wwwinfo.cern.ch/dis/texi2html/">texi2html</A>
       translator version 1.52.</P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/upload/ChangeLog

+2000-08-14  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
+
+	* xemacs-faq.html: Correct DTD in conformity notice by running
+	"make validate".
+	* xemacs-faq_1.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_2.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_3.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_4.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_5.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_6.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_7.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_8.html: Ditto.
+	* xemacs-faq_toc.html: Ditto.
+
 2000-07-30  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
 
 	* xemacs-faq.html: Comply with XEmacs website indentation

File FAQ/upload/xemacs-faq.html

       This document was generated on 26 April 1999 using the
       <A HREF="http://wwwinfo.cern.ch/dis/texi2html/">texi2html</A>
       translator version 1.52.</P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/upload/xemacs-faq_1.html

 	table of contents
       </A>
       .        </P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/upload/xemacs-faq_2.html

 	table of contents
       </A>
       .        </P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/upload/xemacs-faq_3.html

 	table of contents
       </A>
       .        </P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/upload/xemacs-faq_4.html

 	table of contents
       </A>
       .        </P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/upload/xemacs-faq_5.html

 	table of contents
       </A>
       .        </P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/upload/xemacs-faq_6.html

 	table of contents
       </A>
       .        </P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/upload/xemacs-faq_7.html

 	table of contents
       </A>
       .        </P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/upload/xemacs-faq_8.html

 	table of contents
       </A>
       .        </P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/upload/xemacs-faq_toc.html

       </A>
       translator version 1.52.
     </P>
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-faq.html

     <P><HR><P>
       This document was generated on 1 March 2000 using
       <A HREF="http://wwwinfo.cern.ch/dis/texi2html/">texi2html</A>&nbsp;1.56k.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-faq_1.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the first, previous, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_2.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-faq_2.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_3.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-faq_3.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_2.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_4.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-faq_4.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_3.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_5.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-faq_5.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_4.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_6.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-faq_6.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_5.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_7.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-faq_7.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_6.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">next</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_8.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-faq_8.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="xemacs-faq_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_7.html">previous</A>, next, last section, <A HREF="xemacs-faq_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-faq_toc.html

     <P><HR><P>
       This document was generated on 1 March 2000 using
       <A HREF="http://wwwinfo.cern.ch/dis/texi2html/">texi2html</A>&nbsp;1.56k.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File FAQ/xemacs-new.html

     
     <!-- Created: Wed Apr 16 11:20:47 MESZ 1997 -->
     <!-- hhmts start -->
-Last modified: Tue Aug 08 15:47:47 W. Europe Daylight Time 2000
+Last modified: Sun Aug 13 18:15:45 W. Europe Daylight Time 2000
 <!-- hhmts end -->
-    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+    <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
       , PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </body>
 </html>

File Links/ChangeLog

+2000-08-14  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
+
+	* index.content: Fix HTML comment.
+	* tutorials_1.html: Correct DTD in conformity notice by running
+	"make validate".
+	* tutorials_2.html: Ditto.
+	* tutorials_3.html: Ditto.
+	* tutorials_foot.html: Ditto.
+	* tutorials_toc.html: Ditto.
+
 2000-08-03  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
 
 	* customization.content: Conversion of links using 'cd xemacsweb;

File Links/index.content

 
 	<!-- IMPORTANT NOTE TO WEB MAINTAINERS: This is basically a
 	placeholder; otherwise there wouldn't be an index page in the
-	Links/ directory. Please DO NOT ADD LINKS HERE -- put them on
+	Links/ directory. Please DO NOT ADD LINKS HERE &minus;&minus; put them on
 	one or more of the specific pages. Thanks, jsja -->
 	
 	<h1>Links to other XEmacs sites</h1>

File Links/tutorials_1.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the first, previous, <A HREF="tutorials_2.html">next</A>, <A HREF="tutorials_3.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="tutorials_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File Links/tutorials_2.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="tutorials_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="tutorials_1.html">previous</A>, <A HREF="tutorials_3.html">next</A>, <A HREF="tutorials_3.html">last</A> section, <A HREF="tutorials_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File Links/tutorials_3.html

 
     <P><HR><P>
       Go to the <A HREF="tutorials_1.html">first</A>, <A HREF="tutorials_2.html">previous</A>, next, last section, <A HREF="tutorials_toc.html">table of contents</A>.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File Links/tutorials_foot.html

     <P><HR><P>
       This document was generated on 8 October 1999 using
       <A HREF="http://wwwinfo.cern.ch/dis/texi2html/">texi2html</A>&nbsp;1.56k.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>

File Links/tutorials_toc.html

     <P><HR><P>
       This document was generated on 8 October 1999 using
       <A HREF="http://wwwinfo.cern.ch/dis/texi2html/">texi2html</A>&nbsp;1.56k.
-      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"&gt;
+      <small>Conform with &lt;!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"&gt;
 	, PSGML 1.2.1, 21.1 (patch 11) "Carlsbad Caverns" XEmacs Lucid.</small>
   </BODY>
 </HTML>
 XEMACS=xemacs
 # APA: This is what I use on my Windows NT machine:
 # XEMACS="c:/XEmacs/XEmacs-21.1.11/i386-pc-win32/xemacs.exe"
-FLAGS=-batch -q -no-site-file
+# FLAGS=-batch -q -no-site-file
+FLAGS=-batch -vanilla
 GENPAGE_CONF="genpage.conf"
 ELCS=batch-psgml-validate.elc
 CONTENT_FILES=$(shell find . -name "*.content" -print)

File Releases/21.2.28.content

               <li>Add configure support for NetWinders, Sean MacLennan</li>
               <li>Make the "Load .emacs" menu item work again, Kirill Katsnelson</li>
               <li>Make --without-x work again.</li>
-              <li>Detect Xaw3d and friends using #include <Xaw3d/FOO.h></li>
+              <li>Detect Xaw3d and friends using #include &lt;Xaw3d/FOO.h&gt;</li>
               <li>Experimental Drag-N-Drop now defaults to "no" until there is again
    active development.</li>
               <li>SGI dumping fixes should make XEmacs work again on Irix 6.</li>

File Releases/ChangeLog

+2000-08-14  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
+
+	* 21.2.28.content: Quote "#include <Xaw3d/FOO.h>" in LI.
+
 2000-08-12  Adrian Aichner  <aichner@ecf.teradyne.com>
 
 	* 21.2.27.content: Auto-generated by release-mail-to-html.el from

File batch-psgml-validate.el

 ;;;
 
 (require 'psgml)
-(require 'psgml-parse)                  ;;; for sgml-element-context-string
+(load "psgml-parse")                  ;;; for (defstruct (sgml-dtd ...))
 ;;; APA: 'psgml-html does not provide itself.  Why not?
-;;; (require 'psgml-html)                   ;;; for html-quote-region
+(load "psgml-html")                   ;;; for html-quote-region
 
 (defconst psgml-validate-conform
   "<small>Conform with "
   "Phrase to insert for conforming SGML document.")
 
-(defconst psgml-validate-non-conform 
+(defconst psgml-validate-non-conform
   "<small><strong>Not</strong> conform with "
   "Phrase to insert for non-conforming SGML document.")
 
   :group 'emacs)
 
 (defcustom psgml-validate-ignore-directories
-  (quote ("CVS" "genpage"))
+  (quote ("CVS" "genpage" "RSC" "SCCS"))
   "*List of directory names to be ignored by `batch-psgml-validate'."
   :type '(repeat
           :custom-show t
           string)
   :group 'batch-psgml-validate)
 
+(defvar batch-psgml-last-warning nil
+  "Save last warning.")
+
 (defun batch-psgml-validate (&optional file-or-dir)
   "Uses `sgml-next-trouble-spot' from the PSGML package to validate
 conformance of files in FILE-OR-DIR with the specified DTD.  See
            ((member (file-name-nondirectory file) (list "." ".."))
             nil)
            ((file-directory-p file)
-            (if (member (file-name-nondirectory file)
-                        psgml-validate-ignore-directories)
-                (message "ignoring directory %s" file)
-              (batch-psgml-validate file)))
+            (batch-psgml-validate file))
            ((and
              (member (file-name-extension file) (list "htm" "html"))
              (null
               (backup-file-name-p file)))
-            (message "validating %s" file)
             (batch-psgml-validate-file file t t))))
-      (batch-psgml-validate-file file-or-dir t t))
-    (message "batch-psgml-validate %s is done" file-or-dir)))
+      (batch-psgml-validate-file file-or-dir t t))))
 
 (defun batch-psgml-validate-file (file &optional insert-result indent)
   "Uses `sgml-next-trouble-spot' from the PSGML package to validate
     (read-file-name "HTML file to validate: ")
     (yes-or-no-p "insert compliance text ")
     (yes-or-no-p "indent buffer ")))
-  (with-current-buffer
-      (find-file-noselect file)
-    (batch-psgml-validate-buffer insert-result indent)))
+  (when
+      (catch 'file-should-be-validated
+        (mapc
+         (function
+          (lambda (c)
+            (when (member c psgml-validate-ignore-directories)
+              (message "ignoring directory named %s" c)
+              ;; APA: throw a nil value, causing catch to return nil
+              (throw 'file-should-be-validated nil))))
+         (split-string-by-char
+          file
+          directory-sep-char)))
+    (message "validating %s" file)
+    (with-current-buffer
+        (find-file-noselect file)
+      (batch-psgml-validate-buffer insert-result indent))
+    (message "batch-psgml-validate %s is done" file)))
 
 (defun batch-psgml-validate-buffer (&optional insert-result indent)
   "Uses `sgml-next-trouble-spot' from the PSGML package to validate
         line)
     (goto-char (point-min)